Kresge Library

Michigan State University - Oakland

Curriculum

May 22, 1959

Introductory Comments

In January of 1957, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred G. Wilson announced the gift of their beautiful l400-acre estate (Meadowbrook) in Oakland County, Michigan, plus $2 million, to Michigan State University for the purpose of establishing a new university in the area. In addition to the 1400 acres, the estate consists of Meadowbrook Hall, one of the world's fine residences; the modern, smaller hone of the the Wilsons (Sunset Terrace); plus several other residences and farm buildings. The $2 million was for the purpose of constructing the first academic buildings for the new university.

Prior to this gift, Dr. Sarah Van Hoosen Jones had given the university 350 acres of land in Oakland County, located five miles northeast of Meadowbrook. Following the Wilson gift, the University has acquired an additional 200 acres immediately adjacent to the Wilson property.

In total, then, Michigan State University now owns almost 2000 acres of land in Oakland County, plus several buildings, and now has under construction the first buildings on this new campus.

The Meadowbrook Estate is located in the eastern part of Oakland County, near the Macomb County line. In relation to existing population centers, it is three miles east of Pontiac (population 80,000), three miles west of Rochester (population 5,000), and 25 miles north of Detroit.

The great potential of this new development is indicated in the population figures of the area. The combined population of Macomb and Oakland Counties is currently in excess of one million, and it is predicted conservatively that by 1980 this combined figure will reach two million. More specifically, it has been determined that in 1959 approximately 50,000 young men and women between the ages of 18 and 24 live within 15 miles of this new campus; and it is predicted that this figure will exceed 100,000 by 1970.

Further evidence of the staggering potential of this area is found in the fact that there is not now a single post-high-school educational institution, public or private, in either county--except for a new community college in south Macomb County.

Adding to the potential in another dimension is the highly advantageous location of the top research headquarters of the automotive industry. Twelve miles away is the new General Motors Technical Center; less than three miles away is the new site for Chrysler's proposed center for research; and Ford's new proving grounds and testing center is about 12 miles distant.

In accepting the Wilson gift, President John A. Hannah of Michigan State University announced the appointment of a Committee of 50 community leaders from the two counties to assist in developing the new university along the most
productive possible lines.

This committee has subsequently been incorporated into the Michigan State University-Oakland Foundation and will serve in a permanent advisory and supporting role to the official governing board of Michigan State University and Michigan State University-Oakland. (A list of the members of the Michigan State University- Oakland Foundation may be found at the back of this booklet.)

Many important recommendations have been made by the Foundation, and they have all been accepted by the Board of Trustees of Michigan State University. Included among the recommendations are these:

1. That Michigan State University - Oakland be developed as a first-class four-year undergraduate institution, with the possibility of graduate work developing at the earlIest practicable date.

2. That Michigan State University-Oakland open in the fall of 1959 for a fresh man class only.

3. That degree programs be offered in four areas: Liberal Arts, Business Administration, Teacher Education, and Engineering Science.

4. That this new university have a high degree of administrative autonomy, free to develop its own program, recruit its own faculty, and establish its own identity.

5. That there be a substantial program in Adult or Continuing Education, with particular emphasis upon evening and Saturday classes.

The Foundation is operating with an Executive Board (the seven officers) and four major committees. These committees are:

1. Program Development Committee, chaired by Mr. James C. Zeder, Vice President, Chrysler Corporation

2. Continuing Education Committee, chaired by Mrs. Elizabeth H. Gossett, a prominent civic leader in the community

3. Community Relations Committee, chaired by Dr. Paul K. Cousino, Superintendent, Warren Public Schools

4. Finance Committee, chaired by Mr. Don E. Ahrens, retired Vice President, General Motors Corporation

One of the major contributions of the Michigan State University-Oakland Foundation to date has been its enthusiastic leadership in developing the curriculum for this new university. This has been a dramatic example of the involvement of community leaders, nationally-known lay leaders in the field of higher education, educational statesmen, and educational administrators in the formulation of a promising new program.

The pages which follow describe in some detail the product of these endeavors.


MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY-CAKLAND

PURPOSE

The primary purpose of a university is to encourage the maximum possible intellectual development of each student.

This is not to imply that other values --morality, citizenship, personality are not important or shall be ignored by a university, but a student entering a university without the knowledge of what constitutes the primary objective of the institution starts with a handicap.

Each social institution exists to accomplish a purpose. Churches have their fundamental objectives in the realm of morality and religion, industries must produce goods, families must rear the young. Only colleges and universities have been established by society specifically to deal with the human capacity for learning at an advanced level. To forget this is to betray the trust of the society which supports our institutions of higher learning.

Of course, students do not live in a vacuum, and there are secondary learning experiences which not only support the primary, but which are important in themselves. Living and working with other students can teach much about man's historic endeavor to control himself and achieve desirable objectives through cooperation. The assumption or responsibility in student organizations can develop integrity. And most important in a public university is the realization by its students that the knowledge and skills which they acquire must be brought to the service of the people composing their society.

Stated another way, it is the university's obligation to assist each student to attain the knowledge and skills necessary to make him proficient as a professional, competent as a citizen, and happy as a human being; and all of this it must do in a context which never lets the student forget the words of a very wise scholar, "No man has a right to lead such a life of contemplation as to forget in his ease the service due to his neighbor.



THE CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT PROCESS

The curriculum described in this statement is the product of four separate but related approaches to the problem.

Over a year ago a small group of faculty members from the East Lansing campus were brought together under the direction of Vice President Hamilton to serve as an MSUO curriculum committee. (See Appendix I for a list of the members of this committee.) This group spent many hours in developing a proposed curriculum and their work has been highly beneficial in subsequent discussions.

Following this, and completely independent of the curriculum committee's activities, was the work of the Zeder committee of the MSUO Foundation. (See Appendix 2 for a list of the members of this committee.) This group sponsored a seminar in each of the four program areas --Liberal Arts, Engineering Science, Teacher Education, and Business Administration. Participating in these meetings were some of America's most distinguished educators and citizens. They were invited to direct their thoughts to the opportunity of developing a totally new curriculum in a situation where there are relatively few of the traditional limitations. The seminar discussions have been summarized and are attached as Appendices 3, 4, 5, and 6.

During the past several weeks, the third phase of the curriculum development occurred on the East Lansing campus. Working with full knowledge of the curriculum committee report and the general recommendations of the several seminars, the Deans of the related colleges on the East Lansing campus brought together a small group of their own key personnel to suggest ways in which the various recommendations might be implemented.

The fourth phase of this development has been the work of a small group of young and vigorous Michigan State University faculty members serving as a working committee to spell out a specific curriculum. (See Appendix 7 for a list of this committee.)


SOME GENERAL GUIDELINES IN THE CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT

It is only natural that the involvement of more than two score individuals from many and diverse areas, professions, and points of view would produce something less than complete agreement.  Nevertheless, it has been both interesting and gratifying to observe that certain major thoughts have had almost unanimous endorsement. Among these we can identify the following:

1. Modern university curricula are unnecessarily complex, both in terms of their course structure and the major areas of study. It was recommended, therefore, that in this new institution every effort should be made to develop a program which is relatively simple in terms of variety, but which places great emphasis on quality and depth.

2. Following naturally from the growing complexity of course offerings has come an unnecessary degree of specialization and vocationalization of courses and programs. It has been urged, therefore, that MSUO place a major emphasis upon the development of liberally educated students, regardless of the professional field chosen.

3. It would be desirable to sharply limit the number of courses which a student may take during any given quarter or term.

4. Present methods of classroom instruction should be carefully examined with the hope that more productive schemes could be devised for facilitating the learning process for the students. Again and again critical questions were raised about the traditional system of fixed lecture periods, followed by an examination, which if successfully passed, entitled one to the “stamp of approval." The notion was often expressed that this institution, beginning as it is should seek more effective ways to achieve the learning objectives end, if possible, with less dollar cost.

5. The students graduating from MSUO will move into a situation demanding a considerable knowledge of the world beyond Michigan and the United States. Therefore, it was urged repeatedly that programs should be developed which would promote a general understanding of the world community, and hopefully, would equip these graduates with the ability to deal with at least one foreign language. An understanding of the non-western world was described as crucial for the leadership of the next generation.

6. There was much criticism of the existing and traditional organization of subject matter areas. The recommendation was made that a serious effort be devoted to the integration of subject matter in areas where such integration would be productive, and that generally an effort should be made to establish meaningful relationships between the various course offerings.


FROM GUIDE LINES TO SPECIFICS

In an effort to translate the general guide lines described in the preceding section into a specific course of action, the following points have been accepted:

1. MSUO will consider as its first objective the establishment of a first-class, undergraduate program. This does not bar the possibility of graduate work at a later date, but rather establishes a clear-cut priority of effort.

2. In order that this institution may convert to a twelve-month operational program at the earliest possible date, it has been decided that the quarter system will be adopted.

3. During the freshman year the normal student load will be four courses. In the sophomore, junior, and senior years the load normally will be three five-credit courses, except for three additional three-credit courses which may be selected by the student during any three of the last nine quarters.

4. Physical education will not be required for any student, though physical education programs on an informal basis will be available and students will be encouraged to participate

5. ROTC will not be offered.

6. There will not be a separate basic college but a substantial number of Liberal Studies courses will be expected of all students. These courses will constitute about half of the total curriculum and will be distributed over the entire four years, with a heavier concentration in the first two years.

7. The MSUO faculty will offer no course of a sub-collegiate character. It will be assumed that only those students will be admitted who have demonstrated in their high school record that they have the proper training and ability to do college-level work.

Nevertheless, some students inadequately trained in one or more of the basic tools of learning will inevitably appear in every freshman class. An effort will be made to identify such students as early as possible in their college career, and for them the MSUO administration will make available high school courses taught by high school teachers recruited for this purpose. Those who take such courses will be required to pay $15.00 per term per course. This fee should be adequate to defray the cost of instruction.

The faculty will place strong emphasis on writing in all courses, and the quality of a student's writing will be the concern of the entire faculty.

8. The faculty will be encouraged to explore new arrangements for improving the learning process. Rather than prescribe new procedures to be followed, great freedom will be afforded the faculty with the hope that ways may be devised for improving the teacher-student relationship and for accelerating and enriching the educational program. For example, it is expected that less reliance will be placed on the formal lecture and more on small group discussions and personal consultation. Similarly, students will be encouraged to do as much independent study as is productive, with a corresponding reduction in the more formal classroom situations.

9. In an effort to release dollars for faculty salaries, the use of technological devices will be encouraged where they offer promise of improving the efficiency of the program. For example, careful explorations will be made in the use of closed circuit television, tape recordings, records, film strips, and moving pictures.

Finally, it should be made clear that much of the content of the courses listed will of necessity be determined by the faculty of the institution, and that changes will occur with considerable frequency in an effort to maintain a fresh approach to the educational problems of the period.


LIBERAL STUDIES FOR ALL STUDENTS

Freshmen Year
     
1st Quarter
2nd Quarter
3rd Quarter
     
History and Development
History and Development
History and Development
of Western Civilization
of Western Civilization
of Western Civilization
     
Composition and Literature
Composition and Literature
Composition and Literature
Social Science* or Chemistry
Social Science* or Chemistry
Social Science* or Chemistry
Foreign Language*
Foreign Language*
Foreign Language*
or Mathematics
or Mathematics
or Mathematics
     
Sophomore Year
     
Foreign Language
Foreign Language
Foreign Language
or Mathematics
or Mathematics
or Mathematics
History & Philosophy
History & Philosophy
History & Philosophy
of Science
of Science
of Science
     
Junior Year
     
Foreign Studies
Foreign Studies
Foreign Studies
     
Senior Year
     
Great Issues

* Engineering Science and Science students will take Chemistry and Mathematics during the freshman year and Social Science during the sophomore year or as part of the electives available; they will take History and Philosophy of Science during the 1st quarter of the sophomore year. This will be a course especially designed for science students.

(p. 13)

(A summary of the seminar dealing with the subject of the Liberal Arts curriculum is attached as Appendix 3)

LIBERAL ARTS

The liberal arts subjects have their own importance and, at the same time, they are essential to the full development of men simply as educated citizens, whether they are to be teachers, businessmen or engineers. In recent years the pressure on our universities has increased to produce the kind of graduate who has a broad liberal education; and this demand, which is rapidly becoming an expectation, has come from such differing voices as foreign service, scientific research agencies and industrial management.

the curriculum developed here aims at the growth of the individual as a thinker, creator and mature participant in a democratic society. this is the broad commitment of the liberal arts: to produce young men and women with a substantial knowledge of their culture, including an sound understanding of the social and economic life of their society. Properly taught, the liberal arts have the capacity to foster such desirable qualities of mind as humility and sympathy. At the same time, they encourage an inquiring spirit and independence of thought.

By means of liberal arts study students will learn to measure the value of their own and other societies. They will concern themselves with the controversies and issues which have preoccupied men and which have received cultural expression. An effort has been made to strike a proper balance in the curriculum, so that students will have a broadly based knowledge as well as knowledge in depth in special areas. This program is designed to provide students with the resources not only to serve society effectively, but to lead it as well.

LIBERAL ARTS

Freshmen Year
     
1st Quarter
2nd Quarter
3rd Quarter
     
History and Development
History and Development
History and Development
of Western
of Western
of Western
Civilization
Civilization
Civilization
Composition and
Composition and
Composition and
Literature
Literature
Literature
Social Science*
Social Science*
Social Science*
or Chemistry
or Chemistry
or Chemistry
Foreign Language*
Foreign Language*
Foreign Language*
or Mathematics
or Mathematics
or Mathematics
     
Sophomore Year
     
Foreign Language
Foreign Language
Foreign Language
or Mathematics
or Mathematics
or Mathematics
History & Philosophy of Science
History & Philosophy of Science
History & Philosophy of Science
Major
Major
Major
     
Junior Year
     
Foreign Studies
Foreign Studies
Foreign Studies
Major
Major
Major
     
Elective
Elective
Elective
     
     
Senior Year
     
Elective
Elective
Great Issues
Major
Major
Major
     
Major
Elective
Elective
Elective

 

SCIENCE

Freshmen Year
     
1st Quarter
2nd Quarter
3rd Quarter
     
History and Development
History and Development
History and Development
of Western
of Western
of Western
Civilization
Civilization
Civilization
Composition and
Composition and
Composition and
Literature
Literature
Literature
Chemistry
Chemistry
Chemistry
Mathematics
Mathematics
Mathematics
   
   
Sophomore Year
     
Social Science
Social Science
History & Philosophy
   
of Science
Major
Major
Major
     
Mathematics
Mathematics
Mathematics
     
     
Junior Year
     
Foreign Studies
Foreign Studies
Foreign Studies
Mathematics
Mathematics
Mathematics
     
Major
Major
Major
     
     
Senior Year
     
Elective
Elective
Great Issues
Major
Major
Major
     
Major
Elective
Elective
Elective

TEACHER EDUCATION

The development of an effective program for the preparation of teachers is to be a campus-wide responsibility at Michigan State University-Oakland. It is not likely that a separate administrative unit for this purpose shall be established in the near future, if at all.

Essential ingredients in a program for developing teachers for the public schools include: (1) a sound program in the liberal studies, reinforced by solid subject matter preparation in the teaching fields; (2) a knowledge of how children grow and learn; (3) an understanding of the functions of the school in the community setting; and (4) skill in handling the methods and materials of instruction. The curriculum described here has been designed with these purposes in mind.

More specifically, the curriculum proposes that all those studying for the teaching profession will take the following:

  1. the program in the liberal studies,
  2. a major and minor in the subjects which they will teach,
  3. the psychology of human behavior, with special reference to child growth and learning,
  4. the sociology of the school and community, with special reference to the nature of the community, the role of the school and the relationships between the two,
  5. methods instruction in subjects to be taught, and
  6. an internship in the public school.

It is hoped that in operation the teacher education program at Michigan State University - Oakland will develop a close and cooperative working relationship with the public schools of the community, and will be able to make substantial laboratory use of these schools for observation and internship.

Teacher Education

Freshmen Year
     
1st Quarter
2nd Quarter
3rd Quarter
     
History and Development
History and Development
History and Development
of Western
of Western
of Western
Civilization
Civilization
Civilization
Composition and
Composition and
Composition and
Literature
Literature
Literature
Social Science
Social Science
Social Science
or Chemistry
or Chemistry
or Chemistry
Foreign Language
Foreign Language
Foreign Language
or Mathematics
or Mathematics
or Mathematics
   
   
Sophomore Year
     
History & Philosophy
History & Philosophy
History & Philosophy
of Science
of Science
of Science
Psychology
Psychology
Psychology
   
(Human Development
     
Foreign Language
Foreign Language
Foreign Language
or Mathematics
or Mathematics
or Mathematics
     
 
Internship
 
     
Junior Year
     
Sociology
Sociology
Sociology
(School and Community)
Elective
Internship
Elementary School Methods
     
Foreign Studies
Foreign Studies
Foreign Studies
     
   
Elective
     
     
Senior Year
     
Internship - Methods
Elementary School Methods
Great Issues
Elective
Elective
Elective
     
Elective
Elective
Elective
Elective

(p.18)

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Conceptually, there are five objectives to the business administration curriculum.

The first is that each student will be provided with that kind of educational experience which assures an educated and literate citizen. This objective will be satisfied through the commitment of approximately 50 percent of the curriculum to the liberal studies program described earlier.

The second objective is that of establishing a "bridge” between the liberal studies program and that designed to provide the educational basis for modern business leadership. In this "bridge" area there are studies of the American economy, managerial economics, legal and political environment of business, and consumer and purchase behavior.

The third objective is the building of a foundation for effective business administration. In this area the curriculum includes such topics as organization and executive behavior, market enterprise, fiscal administration, management of human resources, analysis of production systems, materials and product logistics, sales and cost forecasting, and business research methods.

Fourth, the curriculum provides an opportunity for the graduate to understand something of the broader implications of business leadership and the business community. To achieve this objective, the program provides courses as: social responsibilities of the businessman, concentration of economic power, international business, and great issues.

Finally provision is made in the curriculum for devoting ten or more hours to a limited professional concentration in whatever area a student might choose from among those being offered.

(p.19)

Business Administration Course Concepts

Consumer end Purchase Behavior

Follows social science in a course to relate the student to the business world. This is fundamental to business in the sense that we have a consumer-oriented vs market-oriented economy.

Legal and Political Environment

Follows economics as another dimension within which business action takes place. Relates back to basic education in such areas as Roman and English common law, and replaces the traditional business law course.

Market Enterprise

Focuses on the external environment for business action; examines means by which firms grow and survive in competitive markets; and provides a market base for the designing of whole systems of business action.

Organization and Executive Behavior.

Has to do with the internal environment of business. It will consider the organization as a social system and assess the role of the executive in this action setting.

Fiscal Administration

Combines the fields of finance and accounting which are so frequently undiscernible in business. Emphasis will not be on ledger entry accounting but on such topics as management aspects of operating statements, balance sheets, flow of funds through the enterprise and capital accounts.

Management of Human Resources

Assesses human resources in an integrated continuum. Designed to replace separate offerings such as personnel management, labor relations, and collective bargaining. The course will stress management considerations.

(p. 20)

Analysis of Production Systems

Will consider various kinds or production systems such as process.,job shop, shop, and line production. While the course will treat production scheduling, control and related matters, these will be subservient to an understanding of the basic kinds of productive organizations and facilities.

Materials and Product Logistics

To consider materials procurement or purchasing and the physical distribution of goods, the transportation, warehousing, movement through transfer cities and optimum location of outlets. This is evolving area of business related to optimum movement of products and suppl.es through time and space, and this course will be designed to preserve the consistency of the basic view of the firm as an operating system.

Sales and Cost Forecasting

Will recognize forecasting as the basic tool of corporate planning and give consideration to the effect of forecast volumes in operating costs. This course will continue the accounting part of fiscal administration and will replace the traditional course in cost accounting.

Business Research Methods

This course recognizes that business problems increasingly will be solved through research and that the executive will be called upon to interpret research reports and pass judgment on findings. This will be built upon the scientific method established in the liberal studies program, using mathematics and statistics as tool subjects.

Social Responsibilities of the Businessman.

Recognizing the corporation as one of the dominant social institutions of our times, this course will assess the role and requirements for enlightened corporate citizenship. It presupposes that if business fails in its social responsibilities, society will choose among the many alternatives in the area of social legislation.

(p. 21)

Concentration of Economic Power

Designed to deal with the economic impact of power concentration, including business, labor, and government.

International Relations

Recognizing the growing participation of American business in foreign settings, this course will deal with the subject from an administrative view seeking optimum programs for overseas opportunities. It will vary substantially from the more traditional courses in international trade taught from an economist's point of view.

Business Policy

This course will focus the student's attention during the last term on case problems from all areas of business. In this course. he will be expected to bring to bear his total accumulation of knowledge on action decisions of strategic importance to the firm.

(p. 22)

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Freshmen Year
     
1st Quarter
2nd Quarter
3rd Quarter
     
History and Development
History and Development
History and Development
of Western Civilization
of Western Civilization
of Western Civilization
     
Composition and Literature
Composition and Literature
Composition and Literature
Social Science* or Chemistry
Social Science* or Chemistry
Social Science* or Chemistry
Foreign Language or Mathematics
Foreign Language or Mathematics
Foreign Language or Mathematics
     
Sophomore Year
     
History & Philosophy
History & Philosophy
History & Philosophy
of Science
of Science
of Science
     
Foreign Language or Mathematics
Foreign Language or Mathematics
Foreign Language or Mathematics
The American Economy
Managerial Economics
Legal & Political
Environment of Business
Elective*
     
Junior Year
     
Foreign Studies
Foreign Studies
Foreign Studies
Market Enterprise
Fiscal Administration
Analysis of Production Systems
Organization & Executive Behavior
Management of Human Resources
Materials & Product Logistics
Elective*
     
     
Senior Year
     
Sales & Cost Forecasting
Social Responsibilities
Great Issues
of the Businessman
Business Research Methods
Concentration of Economic Power
Business Policy
Major Elective
International Business
Elective or Independent Study
Elective
     

*The Course in Consumer and Purchase Behavior will be recommended at this point, although it may be taken as an elective during any of the last nine terms.

(p.24)

ENGINEERING SCIENCES

The engineering science curriculum for Michigan State University-Oakland is a response to the needs of the modern world of science and technology for engineers who are broadly and scientifically educated. Departing from the traditional engineering curriculums and organizations, the program has been designed to fulfill the need for the engineer capable of employing the viewpoints and knowledge of physical science, who can take full advantage of the power of mathematics, and who has also received a breadth of training in cultural areas unusual in the engineering graduates of today.

The engineering program is primarily a three-year orientation to engineering science, followed by a year of specialized engineering application and terminating with a Bachelor of Science (Engineering Science) degree.

The technical work of the first two years is devoted to chemistry and physics. In the third year preliminary studies in the engineering field are undertaken. Appropriate work in mathematics continues during all three years. Topics in the social sciences and from the fields of the liberal studies will also be carried throughout the four years.

The specialized engineering work of the fourth year will build upon the earlier engineering sciences and will allow the student to begin to learn how to utilize his basic knowledge and mathematics in the study of engineering problems and the engineering methods applicable to their solution.

Students may choose engineering courses during the senior year from two major groups. One group will deal primarily with electronics, circuits, electromagnetics, and system studies. The second will include work in properties of materials, heat transfer and mechanics.

Engineering Science

Freshmen Year
     
1st Quarter
2nd Quarter
3rd Quarter
     
History and Development
History and Development
History and Development
of Western Civilization
of Western Civilization
of Western Civilization
     
     
Composition and Literature
Composition and Literature
Composition and Literature
     
Mathematics
Mathematics
Mathematics
Chemistry
Chemistry
Chemistry
     
Sophomore Year
     
Physics
Physics
Physics
     
Mathematics
Mathematics
Mathematics
Social Science
Social Science
History & Philosophy of Science
Elective*
     
Junior Year
     
Foreign Studies
Foreign Studies
Foreign Studies
Mathematics
Mathematics
Mathematics
Engineering
Engineering
Engineering
Elective
     
     
Senior Year
     
Engineering
Engineering
Great Issues
Engineering
Engineering
Engineering
Engineering
Engineering
Engineering
Elective

(p.26)

MATHEMATICS AT MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY - OAKLAND

The mathematics program at Michigan State University - Oakland will be designed to accommodate two classes of students, engineering science students and students who elect to substitute mathematics for the foreign language requirement. It will therefore feature two two-year sequences which can be described briefly as follows.

The science sequence will be devoted mainly to the study of the calculus and its applications. This departs from the traditional program which begins with college algebra, but it is expected that the students entering this sequence will have had a thorough exposure to mathematics in high school.

The non-science sequence could bell be labeled "an introduction to modern mathematics." It will be designed to help the students understand the aims and limitations of mathematics and statistics) aw well as some of the methods and applications. This, together with the course "The History and Philosophy of Science," should provide the student with an appreciation of the role of mathematics in our culture.

The non-science sequence is described in Table I, which follows, while the science sequence is shown in Table II.

 

(p.27)

Table I

MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM I
(Non- Science Majors)

Terms 1,2,3 Functions of a single variable. (A study of the elementary function of a single variable through the methods of algebra, coordinate geometry, and calculus.)
     
  1. Sets and functions, coordinate systems and graphs.
  2. Polynomial, rational, and algebraic functions.
  3. Circular functions.
  4. Logarithmic and exponential functions.
   
Term 4. Statistics
   
  1. Measurements and grouping of data.
  2. Measures of central tendency and dispersion.
  3. Sampling theory
  4. Tests of hypotheses.
   
Terms 5, 6 Probability theory and mathematical models
   
  1. Partitions of sets
  2. Probability theory
  3. Vectors and matrices
  4. Convex sets and maxima and minima.
  5. Linear programming

(p. 28)

Table II

MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM II
(Science Majors)

 

Terms 1, 2, 3 Same as I
   
Terms 4,5 Vectors and matrices, multivariable functions
   
Term 6 Series
   
Term 7 Differential equations and Laplace transforms
   
Term 8 Partial differential equations and special functions
   
Term 9 Functions of a complex variable.
   

(p. 29)

THE CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAM

Based upon the conviction that:

  1. Man possesses both the capacity and desire to improve himself economically, socially and culturally; and that
  2. Man's educational needs as a worker, parent, and citizen in a free society are co-terminous with life itself; and that
  3. A publicly supported university has both the opportunity and obligation to serve such educational needs of its constituency as are appropriate to university-level resources.

Michigan State University - Oakland will develop a vigorous program of continuing education to serve the educational needs of the adults of the Oakland - Macomb community.

The university will provide credit and non-credit programs (courses, conferences, and institutes) in adult education to the extent that its resources will permit. However, such programs will always be restricted and appropriate to university-level resources and standards, avoiding duplication of and overlap with programs of other adult education agencies in the community.

In order to create an early awareness of the need for continuing education on the part of its undergraduates, the administration and faculty of the university will emphasize the implicit need for life-long learning to supplement their four-year experience which, in fact, can serve only as their educational foundation. This emphasis will take form in the establishment of an "Alumni University," a part of the continuing Education program, which will be designed to serve the post-graduate educational needs of MSUO's alumni (and those alumni of other institutions who reside or work in the community.)

In brief, the university will concern itself with serving the educational needs of its graduates throughout life, including those of the professional, parental and citizenship nature. Alumni will be provided with guidance and counseling and systematic educational experiences will be offered in refresher and advanced courses -- both credit and non-credit, technical and cultural -- throughout their lifetime. Professional development programs will be closely coordinated with the alumni's employers to insure maximum effectiveness and applicability of these educational experiences.

Another innovation of the Continuing Education program, and consistent with its function as an integral part of the university program, will be the "invitation to learning' extended to the parents of the undergraduate students. It is hoped that one or both parents will enroll in one or more credit or non-credit courses, preferably in subjects related to the undergraduate's program. Since a "learning environment" in the home would make a major contribution to improved understanding of the educational process on the part of parents of students; but, more importantly, it would add significantly to the confidence, competence, and satisfaction of an important group in the community.


APPENDIX 1

The members of the Michigan State University faculty who were on the original MSUO curriculum committee were as follows:

Thomas H. Hamilton, Chairman
Vice President for Academic Affairs

Walter Adams
Professor, Department of Economics

Edward B. Blackman
Professor and Head, Department of Communication Skills

Cole S. Brembeck
Professor and Head, Department of Foundations of Education

Harold L. Dahnka
Director, Space Utilization and Assignment

Richard Schlegel
Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy

Lawrence W. Von Tersch
Head, Department of Electrical Engineering


APPENDIX 2

Members of the Zeder committee are as follows:

James C. Zeder, Chairman
Vice President, Chrysler Corporation

Howard R. Carroll
Macomb County Circuit Judge

Miss Marion Goodale
Headmistress, Kingswood School Cranbrook

John Gordon
President, General Motors Corporation

Mrs. Elizabeth H. Gossett

George J. Huebner, Jr.
Executive Engineer, Research Engineering Division, Chrysler Corporation

Ernest A. Jones
President, MacManus, John & Adams

Dana P. Whitmer
Superintendent, Pontiac Public Schools

Theodore O. Yntema
Vice President, Ford Motor Company.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Created on11/12/07 by by Linda Hildebrand / Last updated on 8/25/13 by Linda Hildebrand
Oakland University

Oakland University, Kresge Library
2200 N Squirrel Rd., Rochester, MI 48309
(248) 370 - 4426