Kresge Library

Oakland University Building History

Part I, by Al Smitley (1985)

Part II, by Audrey Burke and Elizabeth Raczkowski (2009)

Additional information is available in the Archives Building Files.

Ground Breaking Shovels

Anibal Hall Lepley Sports Center - Intramural Building
Baldwin Pavilion Lowry Early Childhood Center (archives files)
Barns - Belgian Barn and others Matthews Apartments - Married Student Housing
Barns - Barn Theatre Meadow Brook Gate House
Buildings and Grounds Maintenance Facility (archives files) Meadow Brook Greenhouse
Central Heating Plant Meadow Brook Hall
Clinical Research Laboratory Multipurpose Center (archives files)
Cottage District on Adams Road O'Dowd Hall
Dodge Clubhouse Oakland Center
Dodge Hall of Engineering Oakland Center renovations
Elliott Hall Observatory
Engineering Center (2012)  
Faculty Subdivision (archives files) Parking Structure
Fitzgerald Hall Pawley Hall
Foundation Halls (North & South) Pryale House
Foundation Halls renovations - North Public Safety and Services Building
Foundation Halls renovations- South Recreation and Athletic Center
Graham Health Center Riding Hall - Shotwell Gustafson Pavillion
Hamlin Hall Saints and Sinners Scuptures & Fountain
Hannah Hall Science and Engineering Building
Hill House Trumbull Terrace
Honors College (archives files)-- Alvin R. Larson Hall Sunset Terrace
Human Health Building University Student Apartments
John Dodge House Van Wagoner House
Katke-Cousins Golf Course Vandenberg Hall
Kettering Magnetics Laboratory Varner Hall
Kresge Library - 1961 Varner House (archives files)
Kresge Library - 1989 expansion Wilson Hall
Kresge Library - 2009 updates  

Oakland University Building History [Part I ] by Al Smitley (1985) [1]


Anibal and Fitzgerald - Student's Residence Units "A" and "B"

Ground breaking - May 8, 1961 [1]

Dedication - Dec. 17, 1962 [2]

Cost - $598,724.29 [3] Received $600,000 loan from Federal Government to build dorms but did not cover furnishings. [4]

Architect - L.G. Redstone, Architects, Inc. - 10811 Puritan Avenue, Detroit 38, Mich. [5]

Construction - J.A. Fredman [6]

Square footage - Fitzgerald houses =20,610, Anibal house - 20,487 [7]

Photograph - of men living on 3d floor of newly completed Science and Engineering Bldg. Before completion of these buildings [8], general [9], [10]

History - 50 resident women were living in Fitzgerald House (for men) until Anibal House was completed. [11] Fitzgerald was the only of the
first four dorms that were co-ed. [12]

Building name - Mr. and Mrs. Harold Fitzgerald, who gave $45,000. He was publisher of Pontiac Press and was President of M.S.O.U. Foundation [13][14][15]   Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin H. Anibal, retired chief engineer of Pontiac Motors who gave a gift of 1000 shares of General Motors stock to be used to complete the furnishing in the two student residences. He graduated from M.S.U. in 1909 in mechanical engineering. Started with the Olds. Motor Co. In 1909. He was with Cadillac Motor Co. From 1911-1921 and pioneered in producing the country's first 9-cylander car and industry's first electric lighting and starting equipment. In 1925 he came to Oakland Motor Co. and was  chief engineer until retirement in 1947. He is credited with some 200 automotive engineering advancements, including remote control gear shifts, multi-beam headlights, mechanical fuel pump, and automatic spark  control. [17] His $56,000 gift provided the furniture [18]

Notes:
1,13- Oakland Observer, May 12, 1961
2,11,16 - Oakland Observer, Dec. 22, 1961
3,5,6,7 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
4,14 - Royal Oak Tribune, Dec. 18, 1962
8 - Archive file
9 - Pontiac Press, Sept. 22, 1961
10 - Pontiac Press, July 14, 1962
12 - Royal Oak Tribune, May 22, 1965
15 - Rochester News, Nov. 13, 1961
17 - Pontiac Press, Dec. 15, 1962


Howard C. Baldwin Memorial Pavilion

Ground Breaking - Feb. 29, 1964 [1]

Completed - 1964 [2]

Cost - $308,410.67 [3]

Funding - A grant of $76,000 was received from S.S. Kresge Foundation, and Mr. and Mrs. Marvin C. Katke and the Ford Fund Educational Aid Program  each contributed $5,000 toward construction. [4]

Architect - O'Dell, Hewlett and Luckenbach [5]

Construction - J.A. Fredman [6]

Square footage - 24,010 [7]

Photograph - Architect and architect's drawing [8]; general [9], [10], [11], [12]

History - Permanent seating came from a grant of $50,000 from the Kresge Foundation. [13]

Name - Named for Howard Baldwin, trustee and vice president of the Kresge Foundation and member of many Detroit financial institutions. [14]

Notes:
1,2,3,5,6,7 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
4,8,14 - Oakland Observer, Feb. 28, 1964
9 - Oakland Observer, June 29, 1967
10 - Oakland Observer, July 16, 1964
11 - Oakland Observer, Sept. 16, 1964
12 - Oakland Observer, June 28, 1968
13 - Oakland Observer, June 4, 1965


Barn Theater Remodeling

Cost - $18,510 [1]

Construction - Wake-Pratt Construction Company [2]

Square footage - 2,702 [3], 350 seats [4]

Photograph - Before and after [5], moving into and transferring [6], general [7], [8], [9]

History - There was a controversy over destroying the barn [10] and much considering went on about renovating the dairy barn [11], [12], [13]. The Student Enterprise Theatre moved out of the Sports and Recreation Building and into the barn in 1967 and opened with "Stop the world, I want to get off." [14] More information about the restoration of the village can be found in [15] and [16]

Notes:
1,2,3 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
4,6,14 - Oakland Observer, March 15, 1967
5 - Oakland Sail, Sept. 19, 1977
7,10 - Oakland Observer, May 12, 1961
8 - Oakland Observer, July 14, 1961
9 - Oakland Sail, Jan. 17, 1977
11 - Oakland Observer, May 26, 1961
12 - Oakland Observer, Aug. 25, 1961
13 - Oakland Observer, April 6, 1962
15 - Oakland Sail, Jan. 17, 1977
16 - Oakland Sail, Sept. 19, 1977


Central Heating Plant and Distribution Systems

Cost - $3,006,191.32 [1]

Architect - Commonwealth Associates, Inc. , 209 E. Washington Ave., Jackson, Mich. 49201 [2]

Construction - E.E. Powell General ?Contracting Co. , 4479 Pontiac Lake Road, Pontiac, Mich. 48054 [3]

Square Footage - 16, 883 [4]

Notes:
1,2,3,4 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office


Clinical Research Laboratory

Cost - $23,677 [1]

Consultant - G.H. Forbes Associates, 91 West Long Lake Rd., Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 48013 [2]

Construction - George-Damien LTD., 3155 Stanton Rd., Lake Orion, Mich. 38035 [3]

Notes:
1,2,3 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office


Dodge Hall of Engineering

Groundbreaking - Nov. 3, 1966 [1]

Costs - $4,230,103.09 [2] About $5,000,000 [3] [4]

Funding - State appropriated funds and additional funds from the National Institute of Health [5]

Architect - O'Dell, Hewlett and Luckenback [6]

Construction - Lerner-Linden Construction Company, 17379 Wyoming, Detroit, Mich [7]

Square Footage - 135,000 [8] 148,259 [9] 130,000 of working area [10]

Photograph - Ground breaking [11] sketch [12]

History - Construction began on Nov. 3, 1966 and was hampered by sheet metal workers strike which was settled on June 7, 1967, then by a roofer's union strike [13]

Building name - Automobile pioneers John F. and Horace E. Dodge, John F. Dodge was the husband of Mrs. Matilda R. Wilson, whose land Oakland University now stands on. [14]

Notes:
1,2,7,9 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
3,10 - Oakland Observer, Sept. 13, 1968
4,5,12,13 - Oakland Observer, June 15, 1967
6 - Pontiac Press, Sept 5, 1968
8 - Rochester Clarion, July 6, 1967
11 - Pontiac Press, Nov. 1967
14 - Rochester Clarion, Nov. 10, 1966


North and South Foundation Hall

Ground-Breaking Ceremonies, May 2, 1958. 2:30 p.m.

Dedication-Oct. 1, 1959 [1] The dedication program was a half hour long followed by a tea. Speakers were Mrs. Wilson, Harold Fitzgerald, and James C. Zeder, engineering vice president of Chrysler Corporation and chairman of the Foundation's curriculum committee [2]

Cost - $1, 799,254.27 [3]

Funding - $2,000,000 was given by Mr. And Mrs. Alfred G. Wilson [4]

Architect - Swanson Associates, Inc. 74 W. Long Lake Rd., Bloomfield Hills, Mich. [5]

Construction - J.A. Fredman, Inc. , 735 S. Paddock St., Pontiac, Mich. [6]

Square footage - North=67,691, South=55,041 [7]

Photography - Construction with description of dedication [8] ; early campus picture [9]

History - At the dedication, Chancellor Varner said, "You shall find in this building not a single piece of carpet or drapery material.  Furthermore there will be none from money which can be used to improve the salaries of the faculty or to improve the library. The University is not judged by the quantity of carpets nor by the dimensions of a Chancellor's office, but rather by the quality of the faculty and the motivation of the students. It is here that we have set our money and it is here that we shall make our mark." [10] There was a student take-over of the building in protest over admission policies and racism in 1969. [11]

Building name - The name recognizes the work of M.S.O.U. foundation, a group of 50 community leaders, whose work is responsible for its being a state university centered on the liberal arts. Harold A. Fitzgerald was President of the foundation and publisher of the Pontiac Press.[12]

Notes:
1, 9, 12 - Oakland Observer, Oct. 23, 1959
2 - Pontiac Press, Sept. 29, 1959
3,5,6,7 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
4 - Oakland Observer, Oct. 16, 1964
8 - Archives files
10 - Manistee News, Oct. 2, 1959
11 - Oakland Observer, March 28, 1969


Graham Health Center

Ground Breaking - Was scheduled for July 1967 [1]

Dedication - June 3, 1969 [2]

Cost - $576,981.15 [3] $666,566 [4], [5]

Architect - Denyes and Freeman Associates, Inc., 615 Community National Bank Bldg., Pontiac, Mich. 48058 [6]

Construction - Bundy Construction co., 1509 S. Telegraph Rd., Pontiac, Mich. 48053 [7]

Square Footage - 13, 161 [8] 22 bed capacity. Offices for doctors and medical director, living quarters for around-the-clock medical attendants, examination rooms, first-aid room, a therapy room, six hospital wards and two isolation wards. [9]

Building name - Named for Mr. And Mrs. Graham J. Graham for their contributions and support of the University. They were life members of the Chancellors Club, an organization of large donors to the University and both have served as trustees of the OU Foundation. [10]

Notes:
1,6 - Rochester Clarion, July 6, 1967
2,9 -Pontiac Press, June 3, 1969
3,8 -Campus Facilities and Operations Office
4 - Oakland Observer, Sept. 13, 1968
5,7 - Pontiac Press, Aug. 24, 1967


Hamlin Hall

Dedicated - Feb. 1969 [1]

Cost - $3,113,045.01 [2], about $4,000,000 [3], #3,720,000 [4]

Funding - A loan from Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, self-liquidating to be paid out of room and board charges [5], [6], [7]

Architect - L.G. Redstone Architect, Inc. [8], Louis G. Redstone and Associates of Detroit [9]

Construction - Darin and Armstrong, Inc. - 2041 Fenkel, Detroit, Mich. 48238 [10]

Square Footage - 142, 872 [11], 676 students [12]

Photograph - Architects' rendering [13], [14], flags for hostages in Iran [15], general [16]

History - Plans for dorm #7 were scrapped in 1966 due to rising interest rates [17]. Final steps of construction took a long time due to the major strike of construction workers from May 1 to the end of July, in 1968. [18] It is the tallest building on campus (9 story) but is the same height as Vandenberg Hall because it sits in a ravine [19]. On Nov. 4, 1977 the hall was evacuated and searched after Public Safety received a bomb threat and police failed to find a bomb. [20] On Feb. 12, 1973 an unidentified gunman was admitted into a room on the 2nd floor of North Hamlin, demanded money, got around $20. and fled up a back stairway [21]

Building name - For Delos Hamlin, former chairman of the Oakland County Board of Supervisors, elected chairman for 13 consecutive years [22]. He was 25 when he was first elected to the Farmington City Commission in 1930, and was Mayor from 1939-49. [23] Former Councilman and Mayor of Farmington, chairman of Oakland County Board of Public Works. Trustee of O.U. Foundation. Vice President and Director of Metropolitan Fund and member of Executive Committee of Southeastern Michigan Council of Governments, and past President of the Michigan State Association of Supervisors. [24]

Notes:
1,22 - Pontiac Press, Feb. 26, 1969
2,8,11 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
3 - Oakland Observer, Sept. 9, 1968
4,10 - Utica Sentinal, Dec. 19, 1966
5,9 - Oakland Observer, Jan. 13, 1967
6 - Pontiac Press, Dec. 16, 1966.
7 - Battle Creek Michigan Enquirer and News, Dec. 30, 1966
12, 18 - Oakland Observer, Sept. 17, 1968
13 - Birmingham Eccentric, Dec. 29, 1966
14 - Detroit News, Dec. 25, 1966
15 - Oakland Sail, Jan. 19, 1981
16, 23 - Saginaw Official, Feb. 12, 1968
17 - Oakland Observer, Sept. 9, 1966
19 - North Suburban Life, Dec. 9, 1966
20 - Oakland Sail, Nov. 11, 1977
21 - Focus Oakland, Feb. 14, 1972
24 - Utica Daily Sentinal, Feb. 2, 1968


Hannah Hall of Science

Groundbreaking - Nov. 17, 1960

Completed - 1961 [1]

Cost - $1,688,896.39 [2]

Architect - O'Dell, Hewlett and Luckenbach Associates 950 North Hunter Boulevard, Birmingham, Mich. [3]

Construction - J.A. Fredman, Inc. [4]

Square Footage - 89,418 [5]

Photograph - [6]

History - In 1961 the building was used for temporary housing. [7] On November 21, 1969 it was vandalized by unidentified revolutionaries.[8]. Renovations planned. [10]

Building name - For John A. Hannah, Michigan State University President [9]

Notes:
1,2,3,4,5 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
6 - Oakland Observer, July 14, 1961
7 - Oakland Observer, Sept. 22, 1961
8 - Oakland Observer, Dec. 10, 1969
9 - Focus -Oakland, Oct. 13, 1971
10- Board of Trustees March 28, 2012 Agendum


Hill House

Ground breaking - Dec. 1963 [1]

Completed - 1964, 8.5 weeks behind schedule [2]

Cost - $783,854.09 [3], $825,000 [4] [5]

Funding - Used the $825,000 in bonds, which were the bequest of executive vice president of General Motors Corporation, Ormond E. Hunt of Bloomfield Hills [6]

Architect -Meathe, Kessler and Associates, Inc., - 18000 Mack Ave., Grosse Pointe, 24, Mich. [7] [8] [9]

Construction - Alfred Smith, Inc., 721 E. Saratoga Ave., Ferndale 20, Mich. [10] [11] [12]

Square footage - 42,555 [13], about 40,000 with 100 double rooms for 200 students [14]

Photograph - of construction [15][16], near completion [17]

History - construction in March and April of 1964 bogged down and in May when electricians and sheet metal workers went on strike for over a month and a shortage of tile workers in the fall of 1964 tripling in existing dorms was necessary. Controversy over converting it to co-ed because of demand for co-ed housing on part of dormitory population. Alice Hakkix, director of residence halls, after conferring with administrators, denied request because building was not designed to be co-educational. [18] In 1965, a build-up of air pressure cause a toilet to explode, sending a freshman girl and another's mother to St. Joseph's Hospital in Pontiac and treated for cuts and released. [19]

Notes:
1,2,17,18 - Oakland Observer, Oct. 23, 1964
3,13 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
4 - Oakland Observer, Oct. 30, 1964
5,8,11,14,16 - Pontiac Press, July 1, 1965
6 - Holland Evening Sentinel, May 8, 1967
7,10,9, 12 - Pontiac Press, Dec. 19, 1963
15 - Oakland Observer, May 15, 1964
19 - Oakland Observer, Sept. 10, 1965


Renovation of Dodge Clubhouse - Katke Cousins Clubhouse

Cost - $110,000 in gifts and $40,000 loan from OU Foundation [1]

Architect - Harley Ellington Pierce and Yee Associates, 26111 Evergreen Rd/. Southfield, Mich. 48076 [2]

Construction - Frank Rewold and Son, Inc., P.O. Box 316, Rochester, Mich. 48063 [3]

Square footage - 6,038 [4]

Photograph - Fire [5], general [6],[7]

History - A root cellar near the course was to be converted and expanded into a two-level clubhouse but the lowest bid was $192,000 which was $42,000 more than what was available, so they decided to convert the Dodge Clubhouse. Up until then it was used for faculty meetings, seminars and parties. There was some controversy over whether it should be taken out of use for the sake of the golf course [8] On October 17th of 1978 there was a fire which resulted in $150,000-$175,000 in damages to the rood and attic. It started at 315 p.m. and took firemen a half hour to extinguish. Since there was only one entrance caused difficulty in putting the fire out. The southern portion of the attic was damaged. Two days prior to the fire, a $135,000 renovation plan was to begin the conversion into the clubhouse for Katke-Cousins Golf Course [9]

Notes:
1,2,3,4, - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
5,9 - Oakland Sail, Oct. 23, 1978
6,8 - Oakland Sail, Oct. 9, 1978
7 - Oakland Sail, April 7, 1980


Oakland University Golf Course - Katke-Cousins Golf Course

Cost - $427,000 [1]

Funding - Made possible through the interest and generosity of Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Katke and Mr. and Mrs. Harold Cousins of Bloomfield Hills.[2]

Architect and Construction - Robert D. Beard, Inc., 1241 Pinehurst Dr., Fort Wayne, Indiana 46805 [3]

History - It was put o 400 acres of land south of Dodge farmhouse which included land that, at the time was used as a 9-hole golf course by John F. Dodge. Also 3 buildings, Danny's Cabin, Dollhouse and kennel. The kennel was to be the course club house but was destroyed by fire prior to opening the course. [4]

 Named for- In 1969 Marvin Katke, a member of the O.U. Board of Trustees, began making donations for an unspecified purpose. When it passed $20,000, Katke began discussing with O.U. administrators of ways to use the money. He had previously funded a golf course at Ferris State College. He was joined by Harold Cousins and the total contribution was over one-half million dollars. [5]

Notes:
1,3 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
2 - Oakland Sail, Sept, 22, 1976
4,5 - Oakland Sail, Oct. 30, 1978


Kettering Magnetics Test Laboratory

Dedication - April 19,, 1964 [1], May 19, 1964 [2]

Cost - $59,143 [3]

Funding - Two grants, both $60,000 given by Kettering Foundation and General Motors [4]. Grant of $120,000 from Charles F. Kettering Foundation [5]

Construction - J.A. Fredman, Inc. [6]

Square Footage - 3,560 [7]

Photograph - exterior [8], general [9] [10]

History - The lab's construction in 1964 was the result of a hobby begun in 1935 by the late Charles F. Kettering, former head of General Motor's Physics Research Laboratory in Milford, Mich. It was built for Kettering's former assistant, Gifford B. Scott. Schott, who became head of the G.M. Lab, carried on the research after Kettering's death in 1958. Since Gifford's retirement in the early 70's, the lab has fallen into the hands of the O.U. Physics Department, under the direction of Professor Williamson. Professor Williamson described the lab's location at O.U. as pure chance. It seems that G.M. wanted to donate the lab to some university after Scott's research was completed in the hopes that it could be of some future use. They also needed some location isolated enough to keep the very delicate equipment free from extraneous magnetic fields produced by machinery and cars. [9] It was relocated from the Kettering Magnetics Laboratory south of Dayton, Ohio [10]. In 2011 researchers expressed growing interest in restoring and reviving the historic magnetics lab. [12]

Name - Charles F. Kettering was associated with Cadillac Motor Car Corporation in 1910, Delco Dayton Electric Company, and was director of General Motors Research Laboratory [11] G.M. workers helped him to work on the idea of a gyromagnet in iron [12]

Notes:
1,9,12 - Oakland Observer, Nov. 5, 1965
2 - Oakland Observer, May 15, 1964
3,6,7 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
4,8,11 - FocusOakland, Oct. 2, 1973
5 - Oakland Observer, May 24, 1963
10 - Oakland Observer, Dec. 9, 1966
12 - "Historic magnetics lab eyed for renovation." Continuum (College of Arts and Sciences), Spring 2011, issue 2, p. 5


Kresge Library

Ground breaking - Oct. 17, 1960 [1][2]

Dedication - May 12, 1962 [3] [4] [5]

Cost - $1,193,103.55 [6]

Funding - Kresge Foundation grant of $500,000 toward $1,500,000 construction costs [7]

Architect - Swanson Associates, Inc. [8]

Construction - J.A. Fredman, Inc. [9] [10]

Square footage - 76,589 [11]

Photograph - of dedication [12] [13], new roof construction [14], construction [15], moving books [16], general [17]

History - A new roof cost $79,560 and came out of emergency appropriation given by the state to O.U. [18] It was Michigan's first fully automated computerized library circulation system [19]  Building name - Stanley S. Kresge, President of Kresge Foundation [20] Sebastian S. Kresge, founder of S.S. Kresge Company and Kresge Foundation which provided half a million dollars for construction of the building [21] Kresge Foundation was created by Sebastian S. Kresge in 1924. He opened his first store on Detroit's Woodward Avenue in 1897, his second in Port Huron, and his third in Pontiac in 1900 [22]

Notes:
1,20 - Oakland Observer, Oct. 21, 1960
2,5,19 - Archives file
3 - Royal Oak Tribune, May 12, 1962
4,21 - Oakland Observer, May 11, 1962
6,8,11 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
7 - Detroit Free Press, June 17, 1960
9 - Rochester Clarion, Feb. 2, 1961
10 - Lakeland Tribune, Oct. 26, 1960
12 - Oakland Observer, May 18, 1962
13 - Pontiac Press, Oct. 18, 1960
14, 18 - Oakland Sail, Jan 12, 1982
15 - Pontiac Press, Jan 28, 1961
16 - Rochester Clarion, May 18, 1962
17 - Oakland Observer, July 14, 1961
22 - Pontiac Press, May 11, 1962


Hollie L. Lepley Sport Center - Intramural Building

Ground breaking - Oct. 12, 1961 [1]

Dedication - March 12, 1962 [2]

Cost - $1,320,063.18 [3]

Architect - O'Dell, Hewlett and Luckenbach, Inc. [3]

Construction - Erickson and Lindstrom Construction Company, 310 Sill Building, Flint 2, Mich.[5]

Square footage - 74, 027 [6]

Photograph - in construction [7], groundbreaking [8]

History - Construction was halted by a long strike by Detroit Union

Locals (reinforced steel workers). 95% of the work was stopped. [11]

Building name- for Hollie Lepley, Physical Education Director. He was dunked in the pool at the dedication. [12]

Notes:
1,8 - Oakland Observer, Oct. 13, 1961
2,12 - Oakland Observer, March 15, 1963
3,4,5,6 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
7 - Oakland Observer, June 8, 1962
9 - Oakland Observer, April 1, 1962
10,11 - Oakland Observer, June 15, 1967


Oakland Center

Completed - 1959 [1]

Dedication: February 3, 1970.

Cost - $523,682.57 [2]

Architect - Swanson Associates, Inc. [3]

Construction - J.A. Fredman, Inc. [4]

Square footage - 34, 776 [5]

Photograph - Architect's sketch of expansion [6]

Notes:
1,2,3,4,5 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
6 - Oakland Observer, Sept. 15, 1967


Meadowbrook Hall Renovations

Cost - 176,078.87 [1]

Funding - Renovations were made possible by a grant of $275,000 from the trustees of Matilda R. Wilson Fund. The home and its furnishings were turned over to the University to fulfill the wish in Mrs. Wilson's will that the hall be operated as a cultural center. [2]

Architect - Tarapata-MacMahon-Paulsen Corp. , 1191 West Square Lake Rd., Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 48013 [3]

Construction - Waterford Construction Company, 4865 Highland Rd., Pontiac, Mich. 48054 [4]

Photograph - Interior and exterior [5], air view of bldgs and grounds [6]

History - Alfred G. Wilson designed the house in the late 1920's after touring many mansions in Europe, and, at a cost of 43.5 million, built Meadowbrook Hall. It is the largest home in Michigan. It has 100 rooms and contains the largest pipe organ in Michigan. There were 1,400 acres of rolling land which in 1957 was donated by the Wilsons to Michigan State University for the purpose of establishing another college. Public tours started in 1971 [7] Meadowbrook Hall, Sunset House and many service buildings were donated by the Wilsons. [8]

Notes:
1,3,4 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
2 - Focus Oakland, Oct. 6, 1971
5,7 - Oakland Sail, Feb. 21, 1977
6 - Oakland Sail, March 21, 1977


Van Wagoner House - Dormitory #5

Completed - 1965 [1], [2]

Cost - $767,930.65 [3], $900,000 [4]

Architect - Meathe, Kessler and Associated, Inc. [5]

Construction - A.Z. Shmina and Sons Co., 6275 Schaefer Rd., Dearborn, Mich. 48126 [6]

Square footage - 43,305, 200 students [7]

Photograph - Under construction [8], record-breaking shower sitting [9], Murray D. Van Wagoner [10]

History - Construction was slowed due to winter weather and steelworker's strike. [11]. In 1967 a freshman, Irwin Bruade became the nation's number one inter-collegiate shower sitter at 41 hours. [12]

Building name - Murray D. Van Wagoner, Democratic Governor of Michigan and resident of the Oakland County area. He graduated from Pontiac High School and the University of Michigan with a degree in civil engineering. Active in State Highway Commission. Students, when faced with the prospect of living in a nameless dormitory contrived the greatly original appellation "Dorm Phyve." [13] There was a fire on Oct. 25, 1973 at 230 a.m. in the student lounge on the 3rd floor.  The flames were contained in the lounge, but there was heavy smoke damage throughout the building. There were no injuries. [14]

Notes:
1,3,5,6,7 -Campus Facilities and Operations Office
2,10 - Oakland Sail, Feb. 5, 1979
4 - Pontiac Press, May 26, 1966
8 - Oakland Observer, June 11, 1965
9,12 - Oakland Observer, Oct. 6, 1967
11 - Oakland Observer, May 20, 1966
13 - Oakland Observer, Sept. 9, 1966
14 - Focus Oakland, Oct. 13, 1973


Vandenberg Hall - Dining Hall and Dormitory #6

Completed - 1966 [1]

Cost - $3,786,402,36 [2]

Funding - Financed with a loan secured through revenue bonds and repaid with room and board fees [3]

Architect - Ralph R. Calder Architect and Associates, 1600 Mutual Building, 28 Adams Avenue West, Detroit 26, Mich. [4]

Construction - J.A. Ferguson Construction Co., 23861 W. McNichols Rd., Detroit, Mich. [5]

Square footage - 177,593, 566 students [6], 7 floors for 572 students [7]

Photograph - in construction [8], [9], 10], general [11], [12]]

History - In the fall of 1972 there was a flood caused by an overflowing toilet. [13] On Oct. 25, 1968 a bomb scare had several R.A.s and officers searching the dorm for the bomb. After several students were evacuated, suspicion arose that it was a cover for a narcotics bust. Nothing illegal was found. [14]

Building name - Arthur Vandenberg, Republican Senator from Michigan for many years. [15] He actively participated in the formation of the United Nations. He was a member of the U.S. Senate from 1928-53, and was the U.S. delegate to the first and second U.N. General Assemblies. [16]

Notes:
1,2,4,5,6 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
3,7 - Royal Oak Tribune, May 22, 1965
8 - Oakland Observer, May 27, 1966
9 - Oakland Observer, April 7, 1966
10 - Focus Oakland, Oct. 6. 1971
11 - Oakland Observer, Sept. 9, 1966
12,15 - Oakland Observer, Sept. 9, 1966
13 - Focus Oakland, Nov. 1, 1972
14 - Oakland Observer, Nov. 1, 1968
16 - Pontiac Press, May 3, 1966


Varner Hall of Performing Arts - Classroom-Office Building #1

Dedication: July 9, 1971

Cost - $4,279,971.37 [1] $4,725,000 [2] $4,400,000 [3]

Funding - $1,000,000 grant from the Office of Education [4]

Architect - O'Dell, Hewlett and Luckenbach, Inc., Birmingham, Mich. [5]

Construction - Spence Brothers, 417 McCoskry St., Saginaw, Mich. 48605 [6]

Square footage - 119,939 [7]

Building name - Derwood Varner, Vice President at Michigan State University met with John Hannah at Meadowbrook Hall in 1956 and agreed upon the beginning of the university. [8] Chancellor of Oakland University [9] He left to become Chancellor of the University of Nebraska [10], [11]

Notes:
1,7 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
2 - Oakland Observer, Sept. 13, 1968
3,4 - Pontiac Press, April 28, 1967
5,6 - Pontiac Press, Sept. 5, 1968
8 - Oakland Sail, Dec. 9, 1977
9 - Oakland Observer, Sept. 16, 1964


Observatory

Cost - $14,663 [1]

Funding - $10,000 grant from the O.U. Fund [2]

Architect - Oakland University [3]

Construction - Wake-Pratt Construction Co., 2033 Austin, Troy, Mich. 48084 [4]

Square footage - 416 [5]

Photograph - of 14.5 foot diameter dome [6]

History - It was designed and manufactured by the Ash Manufacturing Company, Inc. of Plainfield, Illinois and was sent as unassembled components to the University and [Ash] provided a trained technician to supervise the installation. The telescope was built by Oakland University student, Jerry Persha,  with the assistance of Rochester Adams High School senior, Danny O'Dowd and the Physics Club of Oakland University [7]  Danny O'Dowd was the son of O.U. President, Donald O'Dowd and later attended California Institute of Technology [8]

Notes:
1,2,3,4,5 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
6,7 - Advertizer, May 31, 1972
8 - Royal Oak Tribune, Oct. 14, 1972


Pryale House

Ground breaking - Nov. 6, 1962 [1]

Completed - 1963 [2]

Cost - $335731.93 [3]

Funding - Part of a gift of $450,000 by the Pryale Foundation. [4]

Architect - L.G. Redstone Architects, Inc. [5]

Construction - Frank Rewold and Son, Inc.345 Griggs St., Rochester, Mich. [6]Square footage - 20,829, 96 students [7]

Photograph - [8]

History - Work started after a month-long strike of the Detroit area structural steel workers [9]

Building name - Mr. and Mrs. Harry M. Pryale of Bloomfield Hills. He was former President and board chairman of Baldwin Rubber Company of Pontiac. [10], [11] Their original gift is $450,000 of which $345,000 was used to build the dormitory. The balance was used for other campus projects. [11]

Notes:
1,10 - Oakland Observer, Nov. 9, 1962
2,3,5,6,7 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
4 - Source unknown
8 - Archive file
9 - Oakland Observer, June 7, 1963
11 - Rochester Clarion, Aug. 29, 1963


Jan and Don O'Dowd Hall - Classroom-Office Building #2

Ground breaking - Nov. 2, 1978 [1]

Dedication - July 17, 1981 [2]

Cost - $7,538,280.07 [3]

Funding - H.E.W. grand for $520,717 and $7,979,283 applicant's cash funds, $1,450,000 state appropriation, $7,050,000 building authority [4] Major part of 8.5 million on construction costs were to come from public sale of revenue bonds. [5]

Architect - Tarpata, MacMahon, Paulsen Associates, Inc. [6]

Construction - Etkin, Johnson and Korb, Inc., 10111 Capital Ave., Oak Park, Mich. 48237 [7]

Photographs - In construction [8], drawing [9], interior [10], cartoon [11], moving into hall [12], general [13][14][15][16]

History - A series of labor strikes and breaking of windows delayed finishing. The windows cost $1,000 each. [17] The glass manufacturer, Libby-Owens-Ford agreed to replace the more than 400 exterior panels on the 8.5 million dollar building. Cost of replacement was about one-half million dollars. 60 windows broke. 76 days were lost due to labor strikes. [18] Student labor helped to keep moving costs down [19] Renovations planned to accomodate School of Medicine.[24]

Building name - Donald D. O'Dowd taught psychology full time and M.S.O.U. and was appointed Dean of the University in July of 1961.[20] University Provost [21]  Left to become Vice-Chancellor of the State University of New York [22] Served as President from 1970-1979, replacing Varner when O.U. received its independence from Michigan State University in 1970. He became the institution's first President. [23]

Notes:
1 - Oakland Sail, Oct. 30, 1978
2 - Archives file
3,4,6,7 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
5 - Oakland Sail, March 1, 1979
8 - Oakland Sail, Jan. 18, 1979
9 -Oakland Sail, Oct. 19, 1978
10, 16 - Oakland Sail, Feb. 9, 1981
11, 17 - Oakland Sail, Aug. 25, 1980
12 - Oakland Sail, April 13, 1981
13 - Oakland Sail, Jan. 14, 1980
14 - Oakland Sail, Aug. 25, 1980
15 - Oakland Sail, Oct. 6, 1980
18 - Oakland Sail, Nov. 24, 1980
19 - Oakland Sail, Sept. 21, 1981
20 - Oakland Observer, July 14, 1961
21 - Oakland Sail, Oct. 30, 1978
22 - Oakland Sail, Nov. 12, 1979
23 - Oakland Sail, July 23, 1981
24- Board of Trustees March 28, 2012 Agendum


Public Safety and Service Building

Dedication - Aug. 19, 1975 [1]

Cost - $823,900.30 [2]

Architect - Denyes and Freeman Associates, Inc., 10 West Huron Street, Suite 207, Pontiac, Mich. 48058 [3]

Construction - F.W. Fordon Company, 21255 Middlebelt Rd., Farmington, Mich. 48024 [4]

Square footage - 24,524 [5]

Photograph - Drawing [6]

History - The building was built where commuter lot "B" once was located. [7]
In July, 1974 $80,000 was approved for the Public Safety structure.{8}

Notes:
1,2,3,4,5 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
6,7 - Focus: Oakland, Sept. 11, 1974
8 - OU News, July 23, 1974


Saints and Sinners Fountain

Ground breaking - April 19, 1976 [1]

Dedication - Sept. 9, 1976 [2]

Cost - $63,505.39 [3], $68,000 [4]

Funding - Received $100,000 from Josephine E. Gordon Foundation of Detroit to commission sculptures.  Money for the project was to come from capital outlay funds, the Irene C. Wellock Trust, and the University's Presidents Club, a group of individuals supporting the institution and its programs. [5]

Consultant - Johnson, Johnson and Ray, Inc., 303 North Main St., Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104 [6]

Construction - Wydan Construction, Inc., P.O. Box 1111, Southgate, Mich. 48195 [7]

Square footage - 25 x 50 foot oval, 7 bronze pieces, each 9'6" high [8]

Sculptor - Marshall Fredericks of Royal Oak [9]

Photograph - [10], [11], [12]

History - Craig Redfern, member of the Commuter Council staged a contest for students to nickname the fountain. [13]

Notes:
1,8,9 - Oakland Sail, March 24, 1976
2 - Oakland Sail, Aug. 27, 1976
3,6,7 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
10 - Oakland Sail, Jan. 16, 1978
11 - Oakland Sail, Feb. 5, 1979
12 - Oakland Sail, Aug. 25, 1980
13 - Oakland Sail, Sept. 22, 1976


Trumbull Terrace

Completed - 1965 [1]

Cost - $104,951.69 [2]

Funding - It was made possible by a gift in excess of $80,000 from Mr. and Mrs. George T. Trumbull [3]

Architect - O'Dell, Hewlett and Luckenbach [4]

Construction - Garascia Construction Co., 1397 Hawthorne Rd., Grosse Pointe 36, Mich. [5]

Square footage - 3,392 [6]

Photograph - drawing [7]

Name - For Mr. and Mrs. George Trumbull [8]

Notes:
1,2,4,5,6 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
3,7,8 - Oakland Observer, June 4, 1965


Matilda R. Wilson Hall

Groundbreaking: October 19, 1965

Completed - 1966 [1]

Cost - $2,232,534.87 [2]

Architect - O'Dell, Hewlett and Luckenbach Associates [3]

Construction - Shurrer Construction Company, 2431 Pontiac Rd., Pontiac, Mich [4]

Square footage - 98,153 [5]

Photography - Architect's drawing [6], Laying of cornerstone [7]

History - A canopy was originally planned to extend over the road to N. Foundation Hall [8]

Building name - Matilda Wilson was the wife of Alfred G. Wilson.  In 1956 they offered the 1,600 acre Meadowbrook Farms Estate to M.S.U for the construction of a new college to serve the Oakland County area.  They gave $2 million to begin constructing the first two classrooms and administration buildings, North and South Foundation Halls.  She was very active in university activities [9] On April 7, 1962 Alfred G. Wilson died of a heart attack in Scottsdale, Arizona [10]  On Sept. 9, 1967 she died in Brussels, Belgium, of a massive heart attack after being hospitalized for 24 hours with an intestinal infection.  She was in Brussels with Mr. and Mrs. Harold Clark, managers of her estate, on a horse buying trip.  She was one month short of her 84th birthday.  She was active in the Salvation Army as President and Honorary President.[11]

Notes:
1,2,4,5 - Campus Facilities and Operations Office
3 - Pontiac Press, Sept. 5, 1968
6 - Oakland Observer, Oct. 15, 1965
7 - Oakland Observer, Oct. 22, 1965
8,9 - Oakland Observer, Jan. 15, 1965
10 - Oakland Observer, Sept. 22, 1967
11 - Oakland Observer, April 13, 1962


Building History -- Part II

by Audrey Burke and Elizabeth Raczkowski (2009) [2]


Belgian Barn (and other existing barns, etc.)
:
Photographs:

History/Misc. Facts:
- The Belgian Barn housed a carpentry shop after renovations in the early 1970s.[1]
- The barn was suggested to be demolished, moved to the Barnett Farm site or moved to a site adjacent to the Student Enterprise Theater by university officials. [2]
- A 1970 student committee suggested that the Belgian Barn be converted into office space for student groups or a commuter hotel – 50 cents a night for a bunk – to be possibly developed into a youth hostel – A branch of American Youth Hostels [3]
- This same student committee suggested that the Grain Barn be used for a university film series group, darkrooms, and studios after some renovation performed by students. [4]
- The barn behind the Vandenberg Hall dormitories was allocated $1000 to be renovated into a coffee house and activity center sometime between 1970 and 1980. [5] Iit is used for storage today.
- The first dormitory at Oakland was a renovated milk barn, nicknamed “Pad #1”. [6]

_____

[1] “Wilson Farm Buildings Used by Growing OU” President’s Club Newsletter, Vol. 1, No. 2, Spring 1973, Buildings - Barns file, OU Archives.
[2] Memo to Mr. George Karas from H.N. Stoutenburg, Assistant President, 6/28/71, Buildings - Barns file, OU Archives.
[3] “Student Report on Land and Barn Development for Informal Education and Negative Spaces” 10/1970, Buildings - Barns file, OU Archives.
[4] “Student Report on Land and Barn Development for Informal Education and Negative Spaces” 10/1970, Buildings - Barns file, OU Archives.
[5] “Barns and Informal Education,” Buildings - Barns file, OU Archives.
[6] Wilson Farm Buildings Used by Growing OU” President’s Club Newsletter, Vol. 1, No. 2, Spring 1973, Buildings - Barns file, OU Archives.


Buildings and Grounds Maintenance 1994 (Archives file)



Cottage District (Fraternity and Sorority Houses, Adams Road)

When leased to their respective student organizations, these (usually Greek) groups are allowed to put their insignia on the face of each cottage. It is common for each group to hold a ribbon-cutting ceremony upon completion of any renovations, before move-in.
:
The four homes were built around 1918, to house staff members of the Meadow Brook Estate. They were later acquired by the university [around 1957] as part of the estate. Beginning in 1975, the cottages were rented out to university staff.

Square Footage: - Consists of four 2,000+ square foot homes.

Photographs: Please see Cottage District vertical file, OU Archives.

History/Misc. Facts:
- The four houses which make up the Cottage District are maintained by University Housing, and are leased to various student groups (primarily Greek organizations) at pricing relative to OU’s other housing options.
Phi Sigma Sigma sorority became the first Greek organization to have a house located on OU's campus.[1]
- In late 2004, the Alpha Delta Pi – Zeta Upsilon chapter moved into one of the cottages, which at time of publication housed five members. [2]
- An old garage next to Phi Sigma Sigma was demolished upon orders from the Meadow Brook Hall Historic District committee, due to poor maintenance and structural damage. [3]
- In 2008, the sorority Alpha Sigma Tau moved into another of the cottages, and hosted a ribbon-cutting event. [4]

_____

{1]"Sorority gets a house on OU campus, " Jeff Samoray. News @ OU, 31 October 2001
[2]“Sorority has new place to call home,” Rebecca Wyatt, News @ OU, 7 Dec 2004.
[3] “Demolition.” Oakland Post, 12/7/05. Buildings- Cottage District file, University Archives
[4].“Alpha Sigma Tau moves into cottage house,” Laura Angus, News @ OU, 14 May 2008.



Elliott Hall; (R. Hugh and Nancy Elliott Hall of Business and Information Technology; also Business and Information Technology Building, “SBA Building”)

Ground Breaking: April 20, 1999, at 4:30pm. [1] [2]

Dedication: September 22, 2000.[3] A keynote address was given by Governor John Engler to a crowd of at least 200. Sources give different estimates of audience turnout, ranging from 200 to 400 students, faculty, and community members.[4][5] The order of ceremony included remarks from OU Dean of the School of Business, Dr. John C. Gardner; OU School of Business Professor Dr. John E. Tower; OU School of Business Administration Chair of the Board of Visitors Michael W. Grieves; Governor John M. Engler; and OU President Dr. Gary D. Russi. This was followed by a ribbon cutting ceremony and reception. [6] Donators present at the opening included Michael and Diane Grieves, Sequoia NET.com, OU-MSU Federal Credit Union, Great Lakes Strategies, Suzanne Blum Arnold, and SBA Distinguished Professor Emeritus Karl Gregory. Each of these recognized donors contributed $50,000 or more to the project. [7][8]

Cost: $17.5 million [9]

Funding: The Elliott family donated $2 million towards construction, as well as separate donations to the Sports and Recreation Center, and the creation of an athletic scholarship for athletes in business. [10] The complete list of “major donors,” as of September 15, 2000, includes: R. Hugh and Nancy Elliott; Michael and Diane Grieves; OU-MSU Federal Credit Union; Sequoia NET.com; Suzanne Blum Arnold; Infinite Learning/Great Lakes Strategies; Comerica Incorporated; William and Marjorie Sandy; John and Sue Tower; Derderian Kann and Seyferth & Salucci, P.C. (in conjunction with Ursula Scroggs and Michael C. Palazzola); Blythe and David Doane; Marc M. Dutton; Edward J. Farragher; John C. Gardner; Daniel J. and Miriam L. Meadow; Peter C. Van Hull; and Mark Toth. [11]

Architect: - Albert Kahn Associates, Inc.[12] Trustee James Sharp and Trustee Henry Baskin disliked the original plans for Elliott Hall, due to its likeness to Jackson prison. “Let’s make it less like an institution to be sentenced to,” Baskin commented. “We want it to look outstanding.” [13]The committee later approved a redesign of the building’s exterior. [14]

Construction: - General Contractor: Barton Malow. [15]
- A fence surrounding the site was erected in early February, 1999. Trees were removed, excavation was finished in March, and the foundation was completed June 28, 1999. [16]

Square Footage: 74,000 square feet [17]

Photographs:

History/Misc. Facts:
- Oakland University’s Archives department, housed in Kresge Library, contains the groundbreaking shovel from the April 20, 1999 ceremony.
- Elliott Hall houses an interactive training lab for faculty and staff, education users about e-Learning and Instructional Support (e-LIS). [18]
- Elliott Hall includes a 100 seat technology-enhanced auditorium, one of 10 classrooms in the building. Additionally, there are 57 faculty offices, 34 staff offices, 5 student computer labs, a technology engineering/repair center, 13 “breakout” meeting rooms, student lounge, and a television production suite. [19]
- Future expansion is anticipated by SBA (School of Business Administration), including new programs and outreach projects. [15]
- The TV Studio Suite, located in the IT Institute Wing, level 1, is the home of OU’s cable access channel.
- Stinson Student Advancement Center open Dec. 13, 2010. Named in honor of of Ann and Craig Stinson. [21]
-New Elliott cafe to offer Starbucks: the Timothy and Marsha Healy Cafe to open Feb. 2011 on the main floor of Elliott Hall. [22]
_______

[1]“OU Celebrates Groundbreaking for New Business and Technology Building.” Ted Montgomery, OU Media Relations. Buildings - Elliott Hall file, OU Archives.
[2] “Media Advisory.” Ted Montgomery, OU Media Relations. Buildings - Elliott Hall file, OU Archives.
[3] Business and Information Technology Building Opens. News at OU, 22 September 2000
[4] “The Future of Business.” Jennifer Chamey. Buildings - Elliott Hall file, OU Archives.
[5] “BIT Dedicated to Elliott Family.” Lisa Remsing. The Oakland Post. Buildings - Elliott Hall file, OU Archives.
[6]"Business and Information Technology Building Opening.” Pamphlet. Buildings - Elliott Hall file, OU Archives.
[7]“The Future of Business.” Jennifer Chamey. Buildings - Elliott Hall file, OU Archives.
[8]“BIT Dedicated to Elliott Family.” Lisa Remsing. The Oakland Post. Buildings - Elliott Hall file, OU Archives.
[9]“Business and Information Technology Building Opening.” Pamphlet. Buildings - Elliott Hall file, OU Archives.
[10]“BIT Dedicated to Elliott Family.” Lisa Remsing. The Oakland Post. Buildings - Elliott Hall file, OU Archives.
[11]“Business and Information Technology Building Opening.” Pamphlet. Buildings - Elliott Hall file, OU Archives.
[12]“The School of Business Administration and Information Technology Institute”. Website accessed 17 May 2005. http://www.sba.oakland.edu/development/building/. Buildings - Elliott Hall file, OU Archives.
13]“Trustees Criticize Plans for Building.” Diana Dillaber Murray. Oakland Press, 3 April 1998. Elliott Hall vertical file, OU Archives.
[14]“Committee Approves Redesign of OU Business School Exterior.” Diana Dillaber Murray. Oakland Press, 21 May 1998. Elliott Hall vertical file, OU Archives.
[15] “The School of Business Administration and Information Technology Institute”. Website accessed 17 May 2005. http://www.sba.oakland.edu/development/building/. Elliott Hall vertical file, OU Archives.
[16] “The School of Business Administration and Information Technology Institute”. Website accessed 17 May 2005. http://www.sba.oakland.edu/development/building/. Elliott Hall vertical file, OU Archives.
“[17] Business and Information Technology Building Opening”. Pamphlet. Elliott Hall vertical file.
“[18]The School of Business Administration and Information Technology Institute”. Website accessed 17 May 2005. http://www.sba.oakland.edu/development/building/. Elliott Hall vertical file, OU Archives.
[19] “The School of Business Administration and Information Technology Institute”. Website accessed 17 May 2005. http://www.sba.oakland.edu/development/building/. Elliott Hall vertical file, OU Archives.
[20] “The School of Business Administration and Information Technology Institute”. Website accessed 17 May 2005. http://www.sba.oakland.edu/development/building/. Elliott Hall vertical file, OU Archives.
[21] Transforming spaces, transforming lives: Stinson Student Advancement Center. Website accessed 12 Feb. 2011. http://www.oakland.edu/News/Default.aspx?sid=11&nid=7216&showBack=true&PageIndex=0 ; http://www.oakland.edu/stinsoncenter
[22] "New Elliott cafe to offer Starbucks," by Lauryn Andrews. Oakland Post, 26 Jan. 2011. p. 7


Engineering Center

Ground Breaking: October 3, 2012 at 2:00 p.m.

Cost:

Construction:


Faculty Subdivision (archives files)

See also: http://ouneighborhood.org/


Gatehouse; Meadow Brook Gate House or Lodge

Ground Breaking: 1926-29?

Cost: $23,000 to 26,000. [1]

Construction: Built by Brook-Heinmiller Corp (Detroit), with windows by McCay Bronze Co.[2]

Photographs:

History/Misc. Facts:
- This building was the servants’ quarters for the Meadow Brook estate, and consists of four rooms, a bath, basement, and screened-in porch. This was built at the same time as Meadow Brook Hall, and used the same bricks, stones, and window casements. [3]
- The lodge’s wooden gates sport the family crest, and have a unique suspension system. [4]
- At one point, it was suggested that the Gatehouse be converted into a commuter “crash pad” for those in need of a nap, or an overnight stay, after they are vacated by public safety. [5]

_____

[1]“Meadow Brook Estate Tour, Thursday, May 15, 1980,” Buildings file, OU Archives.
[2]“Meadow Brook Estate Tour, Thursday, May 15, 1980,” Buildings file, OU Archives.
[3]“Meadow Brook Estate Tour, Thursday, May 15, 1980,” Buildings file, OU Archives.
[4]“Meadow Brook Estate Tour, Thursday, May 15, 1980,” Buildings file, OU Archives.
[5]“Barns and Informal Education,” Buildings - Barns file, OU Archives.


George T. Matthews Apartments; Married Student Housing

Ground Breaking: May 7, 1980 [1]

Dedication: July, 1981 [2]

Cost: $2,020,000 [3]

Funding: $1,825,000 came from a Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). loan[4]

Construction:
Contract signed May 5, 1981 with Guaranteed Construction Co. . [5]

Photographs:

History/Misc. Facts:
- Dr. George T. Matthews began teaching history at Oakland as a charter faculty member in 1959. He later served as Chair of the History Department, Associate Dean for Humanities, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Provost, and as an Interim University President from 1979 until 1981. [6] He spoke at the formal groundbreaking ceremony.
- The 48 units, the first of their kind at OU, were constructed in hopes of attracting more graduate students. [7] Originally, the units rented for $250-275, each.[8]

_____

[1] "Groundbreaking." OU News, 5 June 1980. Buildings -Married Housing file, OU Archives.
[2] "Matthews honored by Board." OU News 23 July 1981. Buildings -Married Housing file, OU Archives.
[3] "Groundbreaking." OU News, 5 June 1980. Buildings -Married Housing file, OU Archives.
[4] " Groundbreaking." OU News, 5 June 1980. Buildings -Married Housing file, OU Archives.
[5] " Groundbreaking." OU News, 5 June 1980. Buildings -Married Housing file, OU Archives.
[6] “OU married housing named for Matthews,” Oakland Press 17 July 1981. Buildings -Married Housing file, OU Archives.
[7] “New housing project finally wins approval,” Christine Rea, The Oakland Sail, 25 Feb 1980. Buildings--Married Housing file, OU Archives.
[8] “New housing project finally wins approval,” Christine Rea, The Oakland Sail, 25 Feb 1980. Buildings--Married Housing file, OU Archives.

 



Greenhouse; Lord and Burnham Greenhouse; Meadow Brook Estate Green-House; Meadow Brook Greenhouse

Cost: $50,000 [1]

- The greenhouse is considered to be a “Cadillac” of greenhouses, heated by steam. [2]
- The 1976 restoration relied upon monetary and plant cutting donations from individuals and institutions which included Michigan State University and Cranbrook Academy. The Horticultural Society’s hope was that increasing interest in the restoration project, as well as plant sales, would help to fund the greenhouse in the future. [3]
- In 1988, in an interview, volunteer greenhouse manager Mary Maclean explained that the OU Administration would no longer pay for a full-time greenhouse employee, and that the greenhouse would become a volunteer-run operation. The university agreed to pay building maintenance costs, including heat, water, electricity, and “necessary supplies.” Administration removed John “Geranium Cowboy” Wendland from the greenhouse, and reinstated him as a general grounds crew employee. [4]
- In 1988, the Rochester branch of the Woman’s National Farm and Garden Assoc. donated $1500 for new metal benches. [5]
- The greenhouse and its volunteers host an annual plant sale (usually in May), and profits help to fund the greenhouse’s ongoing restoration and operations.

Architect: Lord and Burnham

Construction:
- Financed by John Dodge in 1914, for Matilda Wilson, an avid horticulturist. [6]
- The greenhouse “was constructed by the leading greenhouse manufacturer of the time, Lord and Burnham.” [7]
- The six-room greenhouse was sorely in need of restoration in 1979. At this point, it still lacked fans and a sprinkler system. [8] The entire structure is comprised of seven rooms, as well as a basement. [9]
- A volunteer group of preservationists were honored with an award on 18 May 2005 for their work in restoring the greenhouse. The group removed trash, installed fans, and made repairs to return the greenhouse to working order. “Work began nearly 15 years ago to restore the greenhouse, but tapered off over the years and was restarted four years ago [in 2001].” [10]

Square Footage: 1600 square feet. [11]

Photographs:
- See “Lord and Burnham Greenhouse: One place where flowers bloom year-round,” Sue Scherer. The Oakland Sail, October 23, 1978.
- See also, Greenhouse vertical file, OU Archives.

History/Misc. Facts:
- The greenhouse supplies the university with flowers and plants for commencement and convocation ceremonies, as well as other university functions. Its flowers are also used around the campus. [12]
- The Oakland University Horticultural Society, a student group of preservationists led by biology undergraduate Jeff Krauth, restored the greenhouse as a biology research project. The group held their first open house and plant sale in December of 1976. [13]
- According to a 1978 article, the greenhouse included “100 varieties of geraniums, palm trees, cactus, orchids, a 50 year old jade plant, and a goldfish pond.” [14]
- University administration discussed closing the greenhouse in 1978, due to the $3600 a year required to heat it, much to the dismay of senior groundskeeper John Wendland.[15] For photo(s) of Wendland, see Greenhouse vertical file, OU Archives.
- The greenhouse has been home to plants which originally belonged to Ms. Wilson, including a 75-year old [in 1988] jade plant and a towering prickly pear cactus. [16]

_____

[1]  “Meadow Brook Estate Tour, Thursday, May 15, 1980.” Buildings file, OU Archives.
[2]  “Meadow Brook Estate Tour, Thursday, May 15, 1980.” Building file, OU Archives.
[3]  “Students restore greenhouse,” Patricia Hinsberg, Rochester Eccentric, 16 Dec 1976.
[4]  “Green-thumbed volunteers sought to dig into work,” Jody Headlee, The Oakland Press, 21 March 1988.
[5]  “Green-thumbed volunteers sought to dig into work,” Jody Headlee, The Oakland Press, 21 March 1988.
[6]  “Lord and Burnham Greenhouse: One place where flowers bloom year-round,” Sue Scherer. The Oakland Sail, October 23, 1978. University Archives.
[7]  “Greenhouse honored with preservation award,” Rebecca Wyatt. News @ OU, 1 June 2005. Buildings -- MBH Greenhouse file, OU Archives.
[8]  ’Geranium Cowboy’ is riding herd on Oakland University greenery,” Mark Clausen, Rochester Eccentric, 1 Oct 1979.
[9]  “Green-thumbed volunteers sought to dig into work,” Jody Headlee, The Oakland Press, 21 March 1988.
[10] “Greenhouse honored with preservation award,” Rebecca Wyatt, News @ OU, 1 June 2005. Buildings -- MBH Greenhouse file, OU Archives.
[11] "Lord and Burnham Greenhouse: One place where flowers bloom year-round,” Sue Scherer. The Oakland Sail, October 23, 1978. University Archives.
[12] "Greenhouse honored with preservation award,” Rebecca Wyatt, News @ OU, 1 June 2005. Buildings -- MBH Greenhouse file, OU Archives.
[13] “Students restore greenhouse,” Patricia Hinsberg, Rochester Eccentric, 16 Dec 1976.
[14] “Lord and Burnham Greenhouse: One place where flowers bloom year-round,” Sue Scherer. The Oakland Sail, October 23, 1978. Buildings -- MBH Greenhouse file.
[15] "Lord and Burnham Greenhouse: One place where flowers bloom year-round,” Sue Scherer. The Oakland Sail, October 23, 1978. Buildings -- MBH Greenhouse file, OU Archives.
[16] "Green-thumbed volunteers sought to dig into work,” Jody Headlee, The Oakland Press, 21 March 1988.



Human Health Building

Ground Breaking:
- The expected groundbreaking of the HHB (one of multiple planned buildings) is for some time in 2009. The expected date of completion for the entire “research hub” is 2014. [1]

Dedication:

Cost: Estimated (in Feb. of 2009) at $61,748,075. [2]

Funding:
- Governor Granholm signed the Capital Outlay Budget for FY2007 (Senate Bill 511), which allocated $40 million to Oakland University to build the HHB.
- The remaining $21,748,075 will be funded by “private support and/or bond proceeds.” [3]

Architect:
- On February 4, 2009, the HHB Oversight Committee recommended the firm SmithGroup to the Board of Trustees “to provide architectural and engineering services for the HHB project.” [4]

Construction:

Square Footage: estimated to be 157,300 square feet [5]

Photographs

History/Misc. Facts:
- The creation of the HHB and its role in the “research hub” is a part of the establishment of the OU William Beaumont School of Medicine.
- Board of Trustees approves design; building to be located on northwest corner of OU's campus. [7] [8]

_____

[1] “Expanding footprints: Three new buildings to be erected on campus by 2014,” Sean Garner, The Oakland Post 28 Jan 2009. Buildings -- Human Health Building file, OU Archives.
[2] “Architectural and Engineering Firm for the Human Health Building: A Recommendation,” Board of Trustees Agendum, 4 Feb 2009. Buildings -- Human Health Building file, OU Archives.
[3] “Architectural and Engineering Firm for the Human Health Building: A Recommendation,” Board of Trustees Agendum, 4 Feb 2009. Buildings -- Human Health Building file, OU Archives.
[4] “Architectural and Engineering Firm for the Human Health Building: A Recommendation,” Board of Trustees Agendum, 4 Feb 2009. Buildings -- Human Health Building file, OU Archives.
[5] “Architectural and Engineering Firm for the Human Health Building: A Recommendation,” Board of Trustees Agendum, 4 Feb 2009. Buildings -- Human Health Building file, OU Archives.
[6] “Expanding footprints: Three new buildings to be erected on campus by 2014,” Sean Garner, The Oakland Post 28 Jan 2009. Buildings -- Human Health Building file, OU Archives.
[7] "OU Board approves design for state-of-the-art human health building." News @ OU, 8 July 2009.
[8] Board of Trustees Agenda, 2 July 2009.



John Dodge House

Cost: Purchased in 1908 for $50,000 by John and Matilda Dodge [1] Originally built in 1880. [12]

Construction: The house was expanded upon to include 14 more rooms [2]

Square Footage: 10,969 square feet. [12]

Photographs:

History/Misc. Facts:
- Originally purchased in 1908 and then expanded in 1914 by John and Matilda Dodge (along with 320 acres) as a weekend country house.[3] [4] The first floor had a living room, music room, dining room, two porches, maids dining room, butler's pantry, kitchen, pantry, milk room, laundry and back room. On the second floor there were eight bedrooms, two sleeping porches and bathroom, storeroom and nursery. On the third floor there were three bedrooms, two maids' bedrooms and an attic.
- Amelia Wilson, Matilda Wilson’s sister, worked as John Dodge’s secretary until his death. Her husband was the former farm superintendent.
- Matilda lived there until her husband’s death in 1920, and returned in 1925 with her second husband, Alfred G. Wilson. They lived in the house while Meadow Brook Hall was being built. [5]
- In 1957, the Wilsons donated the estate and acreage when they founded Oakland University.[6]
- Oakland University used it as an office and classroom for the Continuum Center until the fall of 1977. In 1978 the Board decided the needed repairs were too expensive and boarded it up.[7] The OU Trustees consider razing the old Dodge farmhouse.[7]
- In 1986 the decision was made to turn the Dodge house into offices. [8] The cost of the remodeling was $340,000. [9]
- Today, the John Dodge House is home to the offices of the OU Alumni Association, as well as the golf course.[10]
-One of Oakland University's two Franklin Trees (Franklinia), is planted north of the John Dodge farmhouse.  The Franklin Tree was discovered by William Bartram in 1775 who named it after his good friend, Benjamin Franklin. [11]

_____

[1]“Oakland University History: Building names.” Online site. Buildings, OU Archives.
[2]“Oakland University History: Building names.” Online site. Buildings, OU Archives.
[3]“Oakland University History: Building names.” Online site. Buildings, OU Archives.
[4]“Meadow Brook Estate Tour, Thursday, May 15, 1980,” Buildings --MBH Tour, OU Archives.
[5]“Oakland University History: Building names.” Online site. Buildings, OU Archives.
[6]“Oakland University History: Building names.” Online site. Buildings, OU Archives.
[7] "OU trustees again consider razing old Dodge farmhouse," by Cindy Goodaker.Oakland Press, 19 February, 1984.
[8] "OU to turn Dodge House into office buildings." Oakland Press, 20 February 1986.
[9] "Dodge Farmhouse facelift nears completion." Oakland University Magazine, Winter, 1987. p. 5.
[10]“Meadow Brook Estate Tour, Thursday, May 15, 1980,” Buildings --MBH Tour file, OU Archives.
[11]Campus projects, 2009. Online site. Buildings -- Campus development, Archives.
Dodge House gardens subject of student’s research," by Rebecca Wyatt Thomas. News@OU 22 August 2007.
[12] OU Campus Building Data, 2002. (OU website, Facilities & Management, Capital Planning and Design. Accessed 2/8/2010)



Kresge Library Expansion (1988-1989)


Ground Breaking: December 11, 1987. [1]

Dedication: November 8, 1989. [2]
- On November 7, 1990, the East Asia Reading Room (also referred to as the Leonard Woodcock Room) dedication ceremony was held, after two years of planning and related work. [3] The S. Bernard Thomas Modern Chinese History Collection was showcased in the room for a time.

Cost: Major Expansion: $11.5 million [4]

Funding:
- The State of Michigan contributed $7 million. An additional $2 came from private donors, primarily from Howard L. McGregor Jr., and former students. [5]
- Came from both private and public sectors. $9 million for the “library’s physical renaissance,” $1 million for the acquisition of books and materials, and $1.5 million to support acquisitions endowment. [6]
Architect: Rosetti & Associates

Square Footage:

Photographs:

History/Misc. Facts:

-The new North Wing was named after donor Howard L. McGregor, Jr.
-The new South Wing was named the Alumni wing, in honor of multiple alumni donors.
- The initial proposition for expansion came in 1972, and the entire project was estimated to take two years. [7]
- The renovation was part of the 1986 “A Share in the Vision: The Campaign for Oakland University” campus-wide initiative. [8]
- The original plan, at time of groundbreaking, called for two glass atriums which would connect the new wings to the main building. [9]
- Improvements included an additional 600 study carrels and three times the seating capacity, space for a computer lab and 70 computer terminals, room for 15,000 volumes to return from remote storage, new seminar and meeting rooms, and a more handicapped-friendly environment.[10]
- The card catalog system was replaced by “LUIS,” Kresge’s computerized library system that was introduced as part of the renovation and expansion. [11]
- The Enduring Legacy Endowment Fund donation campaign was established in May of 1990, with the intention of raising money for continued expansion of KL’s reading collection. The pledge goal for 1993 was $3.5 million.[12] Celebrated donors received a spot on the Enduring Legacy Wall of Honor plaques, located in the entrance lobby after its dedication ceremony on December 15, 1992.[13] In 2009 the Wall of Honor was moved to the southeast corner of the second floor.
- The 1998 “Creating the Future Final Report” suggested that the library be reformulated into a Department of University Information, which would have an “expanded role in university information services relating to the creation, collection and dissemination/republishing of information, and the education of students.” [14]

_____

[1] “A Share in the Vision” brochure, Building -- Library file, OU Archives.
[2] “Kresge Library Renovation and Expansion” ceremony program, Building -- Library file, OU Archives, OU Archives.
[3] “Memorandum – Dedication of East Asia Reading Room,” Mel Gilroy, 31 October 1990. Dedication/Woodcock Room vertical file, OU Archives.
[4] “A Share in the Vision” brochure, Building -- Library file, OU Archives.
[5] “Wanted: Donors to finance OU building projects,” Diana Dillaber Murray, The Oakland Press 2/27/99.
[6] “A Share in the Vision” brochure, Building -- Library file, OU Archives.
[7] “Oakland University Library Preliminary Building Program Statement.” Building -- Library file, OU Archives.
[8] “Kresge Library Renovation and Expansion” (program) Building -- Library file, OU Archives.
[9] “A Share in the Vision” (brochure). Building -- Library file, OU Archives.
[10] “Kresge Library Renovation and Expansion” ceremony program, Building -- Library file, OU Archives.
[11] “Kresge Library Renovation and Expansion” ceremony program, Building -- Library file, OU Archives.
[12] “Enduring Legacy Campaign: Kresge Library,” Enduring Legacy – Wall of Honor Dedication vertical file, OU Archives.
[13] "Enduring Legacy – Wall of Honor Dedication vertical file, OU Archives.
[14] “Creating the Future Final Report,” Oakland University, 13 June 1998, 27.


Kresge Library Updates 2008-2009

Dedication:October 22, 2009 [1]

Construction:
- E-Learning (e-LIS) Center Contractor: George Smith, from D&S Contractors, Berkely, Mi. Demolition began in mid-December, 2008. [2]
- Information Commons, located on the 2nd floor of the north (McGregor) wing, was completed in early 2009.

Photographs:

History/Misc. Facts:
- The Writing Center moved into the renovated northwest wing of the 2nd floor in January of 2006.
- In 2008, renovations in reference area resulted in a new main desk, as well as the addition of many new student-use computers.
- Kresge Library received a new roof in the summer of 2008. [3]
- The Jane M. Bingham Collection of Historical Children’s Literature was relocated to the southwest (Alumni) wing in January of 2009, to make space for the new Information Commons. The collection was previously housed in the northeast corner of the 2nd floor.
- The government documents collection was relocated to the basement (KL 154) of Kresge Library in January of 2009, to make space for the new Information Commons. Compact shelving was installed; the first to be used at Kresge Library. Michigan government documents were relocated to a section in the reference area of the 2nd floor. The Gaylor Collection was relocated to KL 106. The Current Journals collection was relocated to the 4th floor, between the north and south wings.
- Between 2004 and 2006, Kresge Library’s computer lab moved from KL 129 to KL 130 (across the hallway). In it’s place, the University Archives relocated to KL 129, in addition to maintaining their storage space attached to KL 100.
- With the creation of the Information Commons, the computer lab moved upstairs, to the center of this new space. Laptops, which were formerly available through the lab, were from that point on available through the Circulation desk. [4]
- The China Gift Collection was established in KL 326/328 in 2008.
- The creation of a library café has been an ongoing discussion between Kresge Library, Student Congress, and Oakland University’s Administration. In January of 2009, OU’s Student Congress made allocated $10,000 towards the café. The café project requires an estimated $75,000 beyond this grant. [5]
The Suzanne O. Frankie Cafe was dedicated on April 7, 2011.

_____

[1] "Kresge Library celebrates grand opening of Technology Center, by Katie Land. News @OU, 22 October 2009.
[2] “Building Work” (copy of email), 12/2/2008, Library – Building Updates vertical file, OU Archives.
[3] “Summer Construction Projects Begin Around Campus” Rebecca Wyatt Thomas, News @ OU. Buildings –General vertical file in University Archives.
[4] “KL-ALL: Info Commons Move-in Today,” (email) Frank Lepkowski, 10 March 2009. Library – Building Updates vertical file, OU Archives.
[5] “Students help effort to build café in Kresge Library,” Amanda Benjamin, 1/15/2009, News at OU. Library – Building Updates vertical file, OU Archives.



North Foundation Hall Updates

Ground Breaking: - 20 April 2000, groundbreaking for the new Student Services Center (Founders’ Day). [1]

Photographs:

History/Misc. Facts:
- OU’s Board of Trustees approved the remodeling and expansion of NFH in March of 1999.[2] Estimated at $2.4 million dollars, the multi-phase project was scheduled for completion in winter of 2001, and included moving Placement and Career Services to NFH from Vandenberg Hall, and moving Graduate Studies from O’Dowd Hall to NFH. (Note: at the time of writing, January 2009, Career Services is still located in Vandenberg, and Graduate Studies is still mostly in O’Dowd.) Reasons for the project include a more convenient and accessible place for these offices.
- In September of 2005, the Board of Trustees reviewed plans for the Student Services Center. [4]This project included a 19,400-square-foot expansion and renovation of NFH, and the new center would “house all essential undergraduate academic, financial aid and advising services including a First Year and Transfer Student Advising Center, Career Resource Lab, Career Services and the Office of the Registrar.” (Note: at the time of writing, January 2009, many of these changes have not taken place.)

_____

[1]“OU to celebrate Founders’ Day with groundbreaking for Student Services Center,” Media Relations, 17 April 2000. North Buildings--Foundation Hall, OU Archives
[2].Board of Trustees Minutes 4 March 1999.
[3] “News and Notes.” Oakland University Magazine, Spring/Summer 1999. Buildings -- Elliot Hall file, OU Archives.
[4] “Board to review plans for Student Services Center,” Rebecca Wyatt, News @ OU, 12 September 2005. Buildings: North Foundation Hall file, OU Archives.



Oakland Center Updates

Ground Breaking: The ground breaking of the 2003 expansion took place on October 11, 2002 at 4:30pm, and was followed by an appreciation dinner for OU faculty, staff and students in the Pioneer Food Court. [1]

Dedication:
- The grand opening of the Pioneer Food Court was on January 13, 1996, and the event included a burrito-eating contest, an appearance of OU mascot Pioneer Pete, radio station giveaways, and a grand-prize trip to Orlando. [2]
- A dedication ceremony was held on 16 September 1999 for the completed renovations of the Oakland Center’s lower level. [3]
- The grand opening and dedication of the 2003 renovations were held on September 19, 2003 at 2pm.
o President Gary Russi, OU Board of Trustees Chair Henry Baskin, OC Director Richard Fekel and Board of Trustees student liaison Rhonda Hanna spoke at the grand opening which included tours of the additions, musical entertainment by the Student Steel Pan Organization, and free refreshments. [4]

Cost:
- The 1996 addition of the Pioneer Food Court cost $1.3 million. [5]
- 1999 renovation of the OC’s lower level cost $2.2 million. [6]
- The 2003 expansion cost $8 million.[7]
- The 2006 addition of the Book Nook, funded by Barnes and Noble and the OU Bookstore, cost $550,000.[8]

Architect:
--DSA Architects designed the 30,000 sq ft. expansion
-- Includes: 330 seats in the food court area; 7,000 sq ft. multipurpose room that seats 600; 24 hour computer lounge; and Café O’Bears – 80 seat coffee shop. [9]

Construction:
- Construction on the 30,000 sq. ft. 2003 renovation located on the Southwest corner of the building began in the Fall of 2002. [10]

Square Footage:
- The 1996 Pioneer Food Court boasted 537 seats (twice as many as it’s predecessor, JWs Café and the Oakland Room), with 4,100 square feet of serving space and 8,473 square feet of dining space. [11]
- The OC’s lower level renovations of 1999 covered 26,000 square feet. [12]
- The expansion which opened in the fall of 2003 covered 30,000 sq. ft, which included: a 7,000 square foot multipurpose room that can seat 600, expansion of the food court area, a 24-hour wireless computer lounge and the 80-seat Café O’Bears. [13]

Photographs:

History/Misc. Facts:
- The renovation of the OC’s lower level in 1999 offered a centralized student organizations space, a game room, a snack shop (Pretzel Logic), a TV lounge, and plenty of seating spaces with computer hookups. The renovation of the OU Bookstore was included in the 1999 renovations. Other additions include spaces for the student radio station (WXOU), The Oakland Post, and the Student Program Board. [14]
- Between in 1998, the improvements in the OC led to a mail and copy center. [15]
- The Pioneer Food Court (which featured a Burger King, Taco Bell, and Pizza Hut) was operated by ARAMARK, and also included D.C. Subs and a Center Stage cooking area. [16]
- The OU Bookstore was run by Barnes & Noble Booksellers from 1992 until 1999, when it changed hands to Wallace’s Bookstores of Lexington, Kentucky. Wallace’s remodeled the store into a more contemporary style, and created an Internet site. [17]
- A 24-hour computer lounge with wireless Internet connected to an 80-seat coffee shop (present-day O’Bears). [18]
- The curved glass façade, part of the OC renovation, is “a two-story, semi-circular glass front offering spectacular views of the campus mall facing Kresge Library, the Science and Engineering Building and South Foundation Hall.” [19]
- The façade was meant to utilize natural light and showcase the university’s expansive view, but was also designed to “connect the campus community – by creating a visual connection to this hub of activity, drawing in passing students, faculty, staff and guests.” [20]
- The 2003 Expansion was designed with student interest in mind. The Office of Student Affairs acknowledged student input when working with DSA/ [21]
- Updates to the OC’s kitchen, in order to meet catering and food preparation needs, took place in 2003. [22]
- In 2004 The Education and Design Showcase awarded OU an honorable mention for the new designs, taking into consideration how the design suited the needs of the school – it was the only student union recognized [23]
- Family Famiglia restaurant replaced Noble Romans Pizza in the Pioneer Food Court in 2006. [24]
In 2006, The Book Nook, a satellite of the OU Bookstore, was built on the main floor near the Pioneer Food Court. [25] In the 1980s, this same area was Charlie Brown’s, a kind of corner grocery and convenience store. This space has hosted multiple other small businesses and eateries over the years.[26]
- Zoup! Restaurant added to the Pioneer Food Court 2009
- CSA Office renovated 2008-09

_____

[1] Ground Breaking Invitation from OU President Gary D. Russi, Building - Oakland Center Expansion file, OU Archives.
[2] “Grand Time planned for grand opening of OU’s food court,” 9 January 1996, Building - Oakland Center Expansion– News Clippings file, OU Archives.
[3] “Creating Community: Oakland Center renovation debuts,” 17 September 1999, Building - Oakland Center Expansion– News Clippings file, OU Archives.
[4] “OC expansion to be dedicated.” Jeff Samoray, News @ OU 10 Sept. 2003. Building - Oakland Center Expansion file, OU Archives.
[5] “Grand Time planned for grand opening of OU’s food court,” 9 January 1996, Building - Oakland Center Expansion– News Clippings file, OU Archives.
[6] “Creating Community: Oakland Center renovation debuts,” 17 September 1999, Building - Oakland Center Expansion – News Clippings file, OU Archives.
[7] “Oakland Center Expansion” Website Press Release from The Oakland Center, Building - Oakland Center Expansion file, OU Archives.
[8] “Oakland Center updates to be completed by fall,” Rebecca Wyatt, News @ OU, 1 August 2006, Building - Oakland Center Expansion– News Clippings file, OU Archives.
[9] “Oakland Center design garners national recognition.” Dawn Pauli, News @ OU 17 August 2004, Building - Oakland Center Expansion file, OU Archives.
[10] “Oakland Center Expansion” Website Press Release from The Oakland Center, Building - Oakland Center Expansion file, OU Archives.
[11] “Grand Time planned for grand opening of OU’s food court,” 9 January 1996, Building - Oakland Center Expansion– News Clippings file, OU Archives.
[12] “Media Advisory – Oakland University to dedicate brand new area of student center,” 13 September 1999, Building - Oakland Center Expansion– News Clippings file, OU Archives.
[13] “Oakland Center design garners national recognition.” Dawn Pauli, News @ OU, 17 August 2004, Building - Oakland Center Expansion file, OU Archives.
[14] “Creating Community: Oakland Center renovation debuts,” 17 September 1999, Building - Oakland Center Expansion– News Clippings file, OU Archives.
[15] “New copy center to offer shipping, mail services,” 6 May 1998, Building - Oakland Center Expansion– News Clippings file, OU Archives.
[16] “Grand Time planned for grand opening of OU’s food court,” 9 January 1996, Building - Oakland Center Expansion– News Clippings file, OU Archives.
[17] “New OU bookstore offers new goods and online services,” 11 Nov 1999, Building - Oakland Center – News Clippings file, OU Archives.
[18] “South Foundation to have new atrium,” Jeff Samoray, News @ OU 17 July 2003. Building - South Foundation Hall file, OU Archives.
[19] “South Foundation to have new atrium,” Jeff Samoray, News @ OU 17 July 2003. Building - South Foundation Hall file, OU Archives.
[20] “Oakland Center Expansion” Website Press Release from The Oakland Center, Building - Oakland Center file, OU Archives.
[21] “Oakland Center Expansion” Website Press Release from The Oakland Center, Building - Oakland Center file, OU Archives.
[22] “South Foundation to have new atrium,” Jeff Samoray, News @ OU 17 July 2003. Building - South Foundation Hall file, OU Archives.
[23] “Oakland Center design garners national recognition.” Dawn Pauli, News @ OU, 17 August 2004, Building - Oakland Center Renovation file, OU Archives.
[24] “Oakland Center updates to be completed by fall,” Rebecca Wyatt, News @ OU, 1 August 2006, Building - Oakland Center – News Clippings file, OU Archives.
[25] “Oakland Center updates to be completed by fall,” Rebecca Wyatt, News @ OU, 1 August 2006, Building - Oakland Center – News Clippings file, OU Archives.
[26] " OU students fight to save ‘Charlie Brown’s’,” Joe Cisneros, The Oakland Press, 1 April 1982, Building - Oakland Center – News Clippings file, OU Archives.



Parking Structure

Ground Breaking: April 17, 2002, OU’s sixth annual Founders’ Day.[1]

Cost: $6 million

Funding:
- The structure was financed through a bond issue that also funded the Student Apartments, the Oakland Center expansion, an electrical power upgrade, and a portion of Pawley Hall. [2]

Architect: Designed by B.E.I. and Associates (Detroit) [3]

Construction: J.M. Olson Corporation of St. Clair Shores. [4]

Photographs:

History/Misc. Facts:
- The structure has three levels, and 550 parking spots. It was built to alleviate the parking difficulties on the east side of campus.
- Opened November 5, 2002. [5]

_____

{1] “Ground broken for new parking structure,” Jeff Samoray, News @ OU, 18 Apr 2002. Parking Structure vertical file, OU Archives.
[2] “Parking prescription,” Adam Demeniuk, Oakland Post 30 Oct 2002. Parking Structure vertical file, OU Archives.
[3] “Parking prescription,” Adam Demeniuk, Oakland Post 30 Oct 2002. Parking Structure vertical file, OU Archives.
[4] “Parking prescription,” Adam Demeniuk, Oakland Post 30 Oct 2002. Parking Structure vertical file, OU Archives.
[5] “New parking structure to open Nov. 5,” News @ OU, 30 October 2002. Parking Structure vertical file, OU Archives.


Pawley Hall; Carlotta and Dennis Pawley Hall; School of Education and Human Services Building

Ground Breaking: April 18, 2001 (Sixth Annual Founder’s Day) [1]

Dedication: Grand Opening - October, 18, 2002 [2]

Cost $31.5 Million [3]

Funding:
- $7.9 Million – General Revenue bonds
- Remaining $23.6 Million – State Capital Outlay Program [4]

Architect: Duce Simmons Associates (Principle architect – David E. Rose) [5]

Construction: J.M. Olson Corporation of St. Clair Shores. Began – April of 2001 [6]

Square Footage: 132,000 sq ft. [7]

Photographs:

History/Misc. Facts:
- Houses School of Education and Human Services and The Lowry Center for Early Childhood Education
- SEHS was formerly housed in O’Dowd for approx. 20 years [8]
- Lowry Center for Early Childhood was housed in former chicken coops on Meadow Brook Farms prior to relocating in Pawley Hall.
- Lowry Center is nationally accredited program and offers: six toddler and preschool classrooms, offices, a kitchen, a teacher workroom, reception area, three outdoor playscapes, and excellent security. [9] [12]
- Dennis Pawley – Member of OU Board of Trustees – donated $4 Million to OU to rename the education building after his wife and himself. SEHS was renamed Carlotta and Dennis Pawley Hall on April 15, 2004 [10] Pawley was a 1982 OU graduate, and created a $1 Million endowment to establish Pawley Learning Institute in February of 2002. He donated $2 Million to schools of Education, Human Services, Engineering and Computer Sciences in 1997. [11]

_____

[1] "Construction projects highlight Founders Day, by Jeff Samoray. News @ OU, 13 April, 2001, Buildings -- Pawley Hall File, OU Archives.
[2] Oakland Press, 10/19/02, Dave Groves. Buildings -- Pawley Hall, OU Archives.
[3] "SEHS moves to new building, by Mary E. Iorio. News @ OU 14 August, 2002. Buildings -- Pawley Hall File, OU Archives.
[4] "Construction projects highlight Founders Day, by Jeff Samoray. News @ OU, 13 April, 2001. Buildings -- Pawley Hall File, OU Archives.
[5] "A learning community: School of Education and Human Services Building- OU, by Wendi Sawchuk. CAM Magazine Special Issue 2003, . Buildings -- Pawley Hall File, OU Archives.
[6] "SEHS moves to new building, by Mary E. Iorio. News @ OU 14 August, 2002. Buildings -- Pawley Hall File, OU Archives.
[7] "SEHS moves to new building, by Mary E. Iorio. News @ OU 14 August, 2002. Buildings -- Pawley Hall File, OU Archives.
[8] "Goodby O'Dowd, hello EHS. Oakland University Magazine, Summer 2001, Buildings -- Pawley Hall File, OU Archives.
[9] "OU to celebrate ED building grand opening. News @ OU, 11 October 2002. Buildings -- Pawley Hall File, OU Archives.
[10] "Founders Day celebrates University, Pawley gift. OU Magazine, Spring/Summer 2004. pp. 10-12. Buildings -- Pawley Hall File, OU Archives.
[11] "Trustees $4 million could rename building, by Lori Higgins. Detroit Free Press, 13 January 2004. Buildings --Pawley Hall File, OU Archives.
[12] "Lowrey puts children at core of new building," by Mary E. Iorio. News @ OU, 19 August 2002. Buildings -- Pawley Hall File, OU Archives.


Recreation and Athletic Center; “The Rec” or "O'Rena"

Ground Breaking: December 4,1996 [1]

Dedication: September 9, 1998 (Opened Sept 8) [2]

Cost: $37 million [3]

Funding:
- About $37 million in general obligation, tax-exempt bonds [4]
- Student fee of $95/semester also went towards construction and maintenance

Architect: TMP Associates (Bloomfield Hills) [5] and Canon-Parkin, Inc.

Construction: See Sports and Recreation Building vertical file for building plans

Square Footage: 250,000 square feet [6]

Photographs:

History/Misc. Facts:
- OU Lepley sports center, built in 1962, was the original indoor center designed for a population of several thousand prior to the completion of the Rec. Center. [7]
- Present-day Rec. center built on location of Lepley.
- The ceramic tiles used are made from recycled glass, the carpet pads are recycled old carpet, and the entrance carpeting is made from recycled tires [8]
- The roof and a wall collapsed in January of 1999 – 4 months after opening, after a snowstorm. [9]
- A 16-panel, 20-foot round stained glass panel of the OU ship emblem was made by local artisan Rocky Martina, of A World of Glass.[10]
- The Rec is a “Green” building, energy efficient with green heating and cooling/insulation, as well as windows and sealants. [11]
- Received “Outstanding Sports Facility” Award from the National Intramural Recreational Sports Association (NIRSA) in 2000. [12]
- Won a “design citation” from the American School and University Magazine.[13]

_____

[1] "Oakland University to break ground on new Recreation and Athletic Center." Press Release - OU News, 15 November 1996.
[2] " Oakland University dedicates new arena, by Dana Gauruder. Oakland Press 10 September 1998. p.A1 .
{3] " OU's new Recreation and Athletic Center exemplifies how today's universities cater to students' taste for amenities." Press Release - OU News, 4 September 1998.
[4] "Plans to build new Recreation and Athletic Center on target. 1 August 1996. Press Release OU News, 8 January 1996.
[5] "Oakland University's Recreation and Athletic Center wins architectural citation for design." Press Release - OU News, 20 December 1996.
[6] "Let's get physical, by Jennifer Charney. Oakland University Magazine, Fall 1998, p. 14-16.
[7] "Let's get physical, by Jennifer Charney. Oakland University Magazine, Fall 1998, p. 14-16.
[8] "Oakland U. pumped for sports center, by Judy Detlaven. Detroit News, 22 December 1995. p. C3.
[9] "Avalance wrenches wall at OU center, by Diana Dillaber Murray & Dana Gauruder. Oakland Press, 17 January 1999, p. A1+
[10] "Turning glass into artwork, by, Gary Gosselin. Oakland Press 2 July 2001. p. B8
[11] "OU Center plans for harmonious building, by Sally Tato. The Eccentric, 1 January 1996.p. 4A
[12] "OU Rec Center receives national award. Press Release - OU News, 2 May 2000.
[13] "Oakland University's Recreation and Athletic Center wins architectural citation for design." Press Release - OU News, 20 December 1996.


Riding Hall and Stable/ Meadow Brook Health Enhancement Institute/ Shotwell Gustafson Pavilion

Ground Breaking: The Wilsons built the ring in 1929.
Restoration announced in 1982 for conversion of the Riding Hall into a conference and exhibition facility. [1] The North Stable was converted into a health center, directed by Dr. Alfred Stransky. [2]

Cost:
- $1.7 Million, to be received as private donations for the conversion. [3]
- The renovation of the stable into the Meadow Brook Health Enhancement Center was estimated to cost about $1 million, and was meant to help accommodated the growing exercise science program at Oakland University. [4]
- The first of the three phases outlined in the Micuda report was estimated to cost $700,000. This included interior work, to bring the structure up to code and laying a new floor. Phases two and three would bring more parking and the usage of the nearby stable. [5]

Funding:
- $650,000 of the projected $1 million for the creation of the stable health center came from an insurance settlement, which was the result of a fire in 1983.
- After completion, “$643,000 of a $941,000 insurance settlement on a Meadow Brook barn destroyed by fire in 1983” was used as funding.[6]
- The Shotwell-Gustafson Pavilion “was financed with $216,000 of a $700,000 gift to the university.” [7]

Construction:
- Constructed in 1929 for the Wilson family. [8]
- In July 1982, it was announced that Micuda Associates, Inc. were contracted design the renovation plans for the Meadow Brook Riding Hall to become a conference, exhibition, and meeting facility. [9]
- Leo Corp. of Troy was contracted to install the Riding Hall’s new floor, drains, and electrical work in 1984. [10]

Square Footage: 21,000 square feet (originally).
After renovations performed by Micuda Associates, Inc., 10,000 square feet of office space, exercise rooms, and research areas, with another 30,000 square feet for “jogging, walking, and other exercise programs.” [11]

Photographs:

History/Misc. Facts:
- Mrs. Wilson housed horses in the riding stable until shortly before her death in 1962. [12]
- The Riding Ring, as well as other Meadow Brook Farm barns, were steam heated and connected to one another for easy access without braving the elements. [13]
- The Tack Room, above the Riding Ring, was a lounge and trophy room for the Wilson family, with a bar, leather couches, fur rugs, and separate rooms for the children.[14]
- Before renovation, the Riding Hall was used by the university as storage.[15]
- Micuda Associates, Inc. presented a restoration plan in 1982 to create an exhibition/multi-purpose facility.[16] This renovation was estimated to cost $700,000. [17]
- Over the years, the Riding Ring has been used for the Glydebourne Picnic, a ski show, athletic events, the construction of stage sets, the storing of equipment and road salt, the Alumni Square Dance, and various other events. [18]
- In 1971, it was suggested that the Riding Hall be converted into a hockey rink. [19]
- In December of 1972, plans shifted towards converting the Hall into an indoor tennis facility. [20]
- It was also a possibility that the Riding Ring would be renovated and returned to its original use, to allow OU students to board their own horses on campus. In 1978, it was estimated that between 30 and 50 students would take advantage of this opportunity. [21]

See Also: Meadow Brook Health Enhancement Institute file & Shotwell Gustafson Pavillion, OU Archives.

_____

[1] “Riding Hall Restoration.” Press Release - OU News, July 26, 1982. Buildings, University Archives.
[2] “Riding Hall Due for Major Change,” and Other vertical file, University Archives.
[3] “Riding Hall Due for Major Change,” and Other vertical file, University Archives.
[4] “Riding Hall Due for Major Change,” Barns and Other vertical file, University Archives.
[5] “Riding Hall Restoration.” Press Release - OU News, July 26, 1982. Barns and Other vertical file, University Archives.
[6] “Riding Hall Due for Major Change,” Barns and Other vertical file, University Archives.
[7] “Horse barn shapes into fitness center,” by Louise Okrutsky, Observer and Eccentric, August 11, 1986.  Barns and Other vertical file, University Archives.
[8] “Meadow Brook Riding Hall Restoration/Renovation,” Micuda Associates, June 1982. Meadow Brook Riding Hall vertical file, OU Archives.
[9] “Riding Hall Restoration,” Oakland University News Service, 26 July 1982. Meadow Brook Health Enhancement Institute vertical file, OU Archives.
[10] “Meadow Brook riding ring under way,” Barns and Other vertical file, University Archives.
[11] “Horse barn shapes into fitness center,” by Louise Okrutsky, Observer and Eccentric, August 11, 1986.  Barns and Other vertical file, University Archives.
[12] “Riding Hall Due for Major Change,” Barns and Other vertical file, University Archives.
[13] “Meadow Brook Estate Tour, Thursday, May 15, 1980,” MBH Tour – Building History vertical file, OU Archives.
[14] “Meadow Brook Estate Tour, Thursday, May 15, 1980,” MBH Tour – Building History vertical file, OU Archives.
[15] “Riding Hall Restoration.” July 26, 1982. Barns and Other vertical file, University Archives.
[16]  “Riding Hall Restoration.” July 26, 1982. Barns and Other vertical file, University Archives.
[17] “Meadow Brook Riding Hall Restoration/Renovation,” Micuda Associates, June 1982. Meadow Brook Riding Hall vertical file, OU Archives.
[18] Letter to Pres. O’Dowd, from Corey Van Fleet, 13 Feb 1974. Meadow Brook Riding Hall vertical file, OU Archives.
[19] Letter to Pres. O’Dowd, from Glen Brown, 15 Dec 1971. Meadow Brook Riding Hall vertical file, OU Archives.
[20] Letter to Pres. O’Dowd from Glen Brown, 20 Dec 1972. Meadow Brook Riding Hall vertical file, OU Archives.
[21]Letter to Pres. O’Dowd, from Corey Van Fleet, 26 April 1978. Meadow Brook Riding Hall vertical file, OU Archives.




Science and Engineering Building (SEB)

Ground Breaking: October 1, 1993 [1]

Dedication: Opening: April 18, 1997 [2]

Cost: $43 Million [3]

Funding: State Funding - $39 Million [4]
Funding for Animal Care Facility:
-- $1.2 Million endowment from land sale to Chrysler Corp.
-- $500,000 from Oakland University fund
-- $ 1 Million grant from the National Center for Research Resources [5]
-- $125,000 from Former Chrysler Executive Vice President Stephan Sharf and wife Rita to fund the Computer Integrated Manufacturing Laboratory [6]
-- $200,000 from Electronic Data Systems Inc. to establish a cutting-edge software laboratory [7]

Architect: Harley Ellington Pierce Yee Associates, Inc. [8]

Construction: Began in December of 1994 by Chrisman Company [9]

Square Footage: 186,465 sq. ft. – consists of laboratories, classrooms, lecture rooms, an auditorium, faculty and departmental offices, student commons areas and related support facilities. [10]

Photographs:

History/Misc. Facts:
- Planning started in April 1989. [11]
- Houses The School of Engineering and Computer Science and Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Engineering and Mathematics departments.
- Houses state of the art animal care facility.
- Roof-top area for solar and atmospheric research projects [12]
- Energy efficient heating system.
- Exhaust heat recovery system reclaims heat expelled from laboratory exhaust system
- State of the art cooling system:
- Energy efficient 500 ton Trane Company chillers can produce up to 1,250 tons of cooling – 400 tons from each of the two chillers, and 450 tons from the ice-storage system.
- Chilled-water system – makes ice at off –peak hours when the cost is lower and stores the ice for future cooling usage
- Saves $40,000 per year in cooling costs. [13]

_____

[1] “Breaking New Ground,” by Jay Jackson. Oakland University Magazine, Fall 1993. p. 12-13. Buildings -- Science and Engineering, OU Archives.
[2] University Invitation, Science and Engineering Vertical File, OU Archives.
[3] “Tour showcases new Oakland University building” OU News, 21 January 1997, Buildings -- Science and Engineering File, OU Archives.
[4] “Breaking New Ground, ” by Jay Jackson, Oakland University Magazine, Fall 1993. p. 12-13. Buildings -- Science and Engineering File, OU Archives.
[5] “University locates funds to build animal center,” by Diana Dillaber Murray. Oakland Press, 14 March 1997. Buildings -- Science and Engineering File, OU Archives.
[6] “Gift from longtime supporters creates new auto research laboratory” OU News, 16 August 1996. Buildings -- Science and Engineering File, OU Archives.
[7] “EDS establishes new lab at Oakland University to produce leading software developers” OU News, 29 July 1997. Buildings -- Science and Engineering File, OU Archives.
[8] “Science Bldg. Takes Shape” OU News, 3 May 1991. Buildings -- Science and Engineering Bldg. Vertical File, OU Archives.
[9] “OU science complex to open in December," by Sally Tato. Rochester Eccentric, 15 August 1996. Buildings -- Science and Engineering File, OU Archives.
[10] OU Publication – Science and Engineering Building Fact Sheet. Buildings -- Science and Engineering File, OU Archives.
[11] “10 Questions (and Answers) About the Science Building, OU News, 17 May 1997. Buildings -- Science and Engineering File, OU Archives.
[12] OU Publication – Science and Engineering Building Fact Sheet. Buildings -- Science and Engineering File, OU Archives.
[13] “Brave New Campus,” by Nick Moretti, 1997. Engineered Systems 14, no. 9:62. Business Source Premier, EBSCOhost. Buildings -- Science and Engineering File, OU Archives.


South Foundation Hall Updates

Ground Breaking: Work on the 1st floor renovations began in May of 2005. [1]

Dedication:
- A ribbon-cutting ceremony was held for the renovated 1st floor on 31 August 2005. [2] Tours and demonstrations of the new technologies were offered, and refreshments were served. [3]

Cost:
- The cost of the 2005 renovation of the 1st floor was budgeted at $522,000, to upgrade the technology and physical attributes of all 13 classroom, stairwell, and hallway(s). Construction - $97,037. Technology - $248,000. Furniture - $176,100. [4]
- The cost of the 2006 renovation of the 2nd floor was estimated at $865,000, including repairs to the stairwells and elevator. [5]

Funding: One-time State appropriation rebate from FY 2005, received in FY 2006 in the amount of $844,800, with the balance to be funded from the University Technology Fund. [6]

History/Misc. Facts:
- The Fishbowl, the atrium connected to the front of SFH, with the goal of allowing better views of the Oakland Center’s new façade. These changes resulted in a smaller fishbowl (by about half the size). [7]
- Physical and technological changes were made in the 2005 renovation of SFH’s 1st floor. Each of the 13 classrooms received video projector and computer upgrades. The first floor received a new stairwell, corridor paint, and furniture in addition to the technology upgrades.[8]
- In April of 2006, the Board of Trustees voted to renovate the second floor of SFH, after completing first floor renovations which took place in 2005.[9]

_____

[1]“Vandenberg café and SFH get updated looks,” by Kristin Sommer. The Oakland Post 15 June 2005. Buildings -- South Foundation Hall file, OU Archives.
[2]“Renovated SFH to open in time for classes,” Rebecca Wyatt. News @ OU 25 August 2005. South Foundation Hall vertical file, OU Archives.
[3]Ribbon cutting ceremony flier (email version – original also in folder). South Foundation Hall vertical file, OU Archives.
[4]“South Foundation Hall Classroom Improvement Project,” by Steven J. Shablin. Power point presentation to the Senate, 17 February 2005.Buildings-- South Foundation Hall file, OU Archives.
[5]“BOT votes to upgrade SFH,” Jeff Kranitz, The Oakland Post 12 April 2006. Buildings -- South Foundation Hall file, OU Archives.
[6] "Approval to renovate South Foundation Hall." Oakland University Board of Trustees Agenda, April 2006.
[7] “South Foundation to have new atrium,” by Jeff Samoray. News @ OU 17 July 2003. Buildings -- South Foundation Hall file, OU Archives.
[8] “Vandenberg café and SFH get updated looks,” by Kristin Sommer. The Oakland Post 15 June 2005. Buildings -- South Foundation Hall file, OU Archives.
[9] “BOT votes to upgrade SFH,” by Jeff Kranitz. The Oakland Post 12 April 2006. Buildings -- South Foundation Hall file, OU Archives


Sunset Terrace

Ground Breaking: 1951 [1]

Architect: William Kapp – Smith Hinchman & Grylls [2]

Construction: Completed in 1953. [3] General Contractor: Frank Rewold (Rochester). [4]

Square Footage: 11,400 sq. ft. [5]

Photographs:

History/Misc. Facts:
- Originally designed and built as a summer retirement home for Alfred and Matilda Dodge Wilson. Their winter home was in Scottsdale, Arizona, and their other summer residence was in Bar Harbor, Maine. [6]
- The house was occupied by the Wilsons from 1953 until 1962, and again by Mrs. Wilson following the death of Mr. Wilson, until she passed away in 1967.[7]
- Became official residence for university presidents in 1974 until 1986 when President Champagne and family moved to off-campus housing.
- The house was styled after Frank Lloyd Wright’s prairie architecture with an extensive use of glass and natural lighting.[8]
- The house was redecorated and furnished with the help of interior designer Pipsan Sarrinen Swanson and the Matilda Wilson Charitable Trust. In 1971, the entry foyer, stairway and landing, Mr. Wilson’s study, and circular living and dining areas, were refurbished. [9]
- From 1968 until 1974, Chancellor Varner used Sunset Terrace for official entertaining. From 1971-1973, the south wing was used as university offices for the President, and then for Alumni and Community Relations.
- In 1974, it became the official residence for OU’s President. [10]
- The building was restored in 1986 for tours and used as a conference center until 1992, when it was restored as the university President’s residence. [11]

_____

[1]  “Meadow Brook Estate Tour, Thursday, May 15, 1980,” Buildings -- MBH Tour – Building History File, OU Archives.
[2] “Oakland University’s Sunset Terrace” OU Pamphlet Publication, Buildings -- Sunset Terrace File, OU Archives
[3] “Oakland University’s Sunset Terrace” OU Pamphlet Publication, Buildings -- Sunset Terrace File, OU Archives
[4] “Peeking Beyond OU’s Public Tour” Jody Headlee, Oakland Press, 21 July 1978, Buildings -- Sunset Terrace File, OU Archives.
[5] “Oakland University’s Sunset Terrace” OU Pamphlet Publication, Buildings -- Sunset Terrace File, OU Archives.
[6] “Meadow Brook Estate Tour, Thursday, May 15, 1980,” Buildings -- MBH Tour – Building History File, OU Archives.
[7] “Meadow Brook Estate Tour, Thursday, May 15, 1980,” Buildings -- MBH Tour – Building History File, OU Archives.
[8] “Tours: Sunset Terrace Revisited” Rochester Clarion, 19 June 1986, Buildings -- Sunset Terrace File, OU Archives.
[9] “Meadow Brook Estate Tour, Thursday, May 15, 1980,” Buildings -- MBH Tour – Building History File, OU Archives.
[10] “Meadow Brook Estate Tour, Thursday, May 15, 1980,” Buildings -- MBH Tour – Building History File, OU Archives.
[11]  “Oakland University’s Sunset Terrace” OU Pamphlet Publication, Buildings -- Sunset Terrace File, OU Archives.

               


University Student Apartments (USA); Student Housing Apartment Complex (SHAC)

Ground Breaking: April 18, 2002 at 8:30am.[1]

Dedication: The ceremony was held Friday, September 6, 2002, at 3pm.[2]

Cost: $21 million [3]

Funding: “The total project … is being financed by the issuance of general revenue bonds. Revenue generated by student rentals will cover the debt service.” [4]

Architect: Demarest and Associates Architects [5]

Construction: Built by Capstone Development Corp. (Birmingham)

Square Footage: 176,000 square feet [6]

Photographs:

History/Misc. Facts:
- The University Student Apartments consist of six three-story residence buildings, as well as a common “clubhouse”. The tudor-style apartment buildings can hold up to 459 residents, in 132 units. [7]
- “Each student will have a private bedroom equipped with cable and Internet access. And every apartment unit will be fully furnished with contemporary wood furniture and modern appliances, including microwave ovens, and washers and dryers.” [8]
- - Amenities in and around this clubhouse include a TV room, computers, a small kitchen, pool table, deck with grill, basketball court, volleyball court, and general lounge. The clubhouse, or “4000 Building,” also contains residence offices for the complex, as well as resident mailboxes.
- Initially, rental rates ranged from $4,240 to &6,360 per student per academic year, depending on unit size and rental period. [9]

_____

[1] “Construction projects highlight Founders’ Day,” Jeff Samoray, News @ OU, 13 April 2001. Buildings --Student Apartments file, OU Archives.
[2] “Students move into new apartments,” Jeff Samoray, News @ OU, 28 August 2002. Buildings --Student Apartments file, OU Archives.
[3] “From the ground up,” Oakland University Magazine, Summer 2001. Buildings --Student Apartments file, OU Archives.
[4] “Construction projects highlight Founders’ Day,” Jeff Samoray, News @ OU, 13 April 2001. Buildings --Student Apartments file, OU Archives.
[5] “From the ground up,” Oakland University Magazine, Summer 2001. p. 16-17. Buildings --Student Apartments file, OU Archives.
[6] “From the ground up,” Oakland University Magazine, Summer 2001. p. 16-17. Buildings --Student Apartments file, OU Archives.
[7]“Construction Begins…” Buildings --Pawley Hall file, OU Archives.
[8] “From the ground up,” Oakland University Magazine, Summer 2001. Buildings --Student Apartments file, OU Archives.
[9] “Students move into new apartments,” Jeff Samoray, News @ OU, 28 August 2002. Buildings --Student Apartments file, OU Archives.

***************************************************************************************************************************************************************

[1]Document posted on the OU website with the permission of the author, Al Smitley, August, 2002. Originally researched and written for HST 399, 1985.
Edited by Linda L. Hildebrand

[2] Document by posted on the OU website with the permission of the authors, seniors Audrey Burke and Elizabeth Raczkowski. Originally researched and written as an archives winter 2009 project while Ms. Burke was an Archives assistant and Ms. Razckowski was completing an archives intership through the OU English Dept. Edited and augmented by Linda L. Hildebrand

 


Created on 1/26/10 by Linda Hildebrand / Last updated on 8/25/13 by Linda Hildebrand
Oakland University

Oakland University, Kresge Library
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