Kresge Library

Two Lectures by Tom Barone

 

Tom Barone What is Narrative Social Research and What is it Good For?
Tuesday, November 11, 2008
Noon
134 Varner Hall
Oakland University
The Educational Imaginary and the Ethics of Narrative Research
Tuesday, November 11, 2008
6pm

134 Varner Hall
Oakland University
About the Speaker
(View Dr. Barone's CV)
Tom Barone is a Professor of Education at Arizona State University. Nearly 30 years ago, Barone’s dissertation at Stanford University investigated the possibilities of literary non-fiction for researching and writing about educational matters. Since then he has explored, conceptually and through examples, a variety of narrative and arts-based approaches to theorizing about and contextualizing significant educational issues. Barone is the author of Aesthetics, Politics, and Educational Inquiry: Essays and Examples and Touching Eternity: The Enduring Outcomes of Teaching. He is currently co-authoring a book with Elliot Eisner of Stanford University entitled Imagination and Method: Arts-Based Forms of Qualitative Research. Barone teaches courses in curriculum studies and qualitative research methods in the Arizona State University Mary Lou Fulton College of Education.


Sponsored by

Center for Applied Research in Musical Understanding
College of Arts and Sciences
Oakland University Department of Music, Theatre & Dance
Oakland University School of Education and Human Services
A generous gift from an anonymous alumni donor


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Recommended Reading
Barone, T. (2000). Ways of being at risk: The case of Billy Charles Barnett. In T. Barone (Ed.), Aesthetics, politics, and educational inquiry: Essays and examples. New York: Peter Lang.

Barone, T. (2001). Touching eternity: The enduring outcomes of teaching. New York: Teachers College Press.

Behar, R. (1996). The girl in the cast. In R. Behar (Ed.), The vulnerable observer: Anthropology that breaks your heart (pp. 104-132). Boston: Beacon Press.

Ben-Peretz, M. (1995). What do the stories tell us? Learning about teachers and teaching. In Learning from experiences: Memory and the teacher’s account of teaching (pp. 75-93). Albany: State University of New York Press.

Casey, K. (1993). A signifying discourse of black women teachers working for social change. In I answer with my life: Life histories of women teachers working for social change (pp.107-153). New York: Routledge.

Coulter, D. (1999). The epic and the novel: Dialogism and teacher research. Educational Researcher 28(3): 4-13.

Ellis, C. (2003). The call of ethnographic stories. In The ethnographic I (pp. 24-57). Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira.

Goodson, I. (1995). The story so far: Personal knowledge and the political. In J. Hatch and R. Wisniewski (Eds.), Life history and narrative (pp. 89-98). London: Falmer Press.

hooks, b. (1994). Narratives of struggle. In P. Mariani (Ed.), Critical fictions: The politics of imaginative writing (pp. 53-61). Seattle, WA: Bay Press.

Lather, P. (1997). Creating a multilayered text: Women, AIDS, and angels. In W. Tierney and Y. Lincoln (Eds.), Representation and the text: Re-framing the narrative voice (pp. 233-258). Albany: SUNY Press.

Richardson, L. (1997a). Louisa May’s story of her life. In Fields of play: Constructing an academic life (pp. 131-135). New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.

Richardson, L. (1997b). The poetic representation of lives. In Fields of play: Constructing an academic life (pp. 139-144). New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.

Sparkes, A. (1996). The fatal flaw: A narrative of the fragile body-self. Qualitative Inquiry 2(4): 463-94.

Tanaka, G. (1997). Pico College. In W. Tierney and Y. Lincoln (Eds.), Representation and the text: Re-framing the narrative voice (pp. 259-299). Albany: State University of New York Press.

Tierney, W. (1993). Self and identity in a postmodern world: A life story. In D. McLaughlin and W.G. Tierney (Eds.), Naming silenced lives (pp. 119-134). New York: Routledge.


Created on 10/20/2008 by Shawn Lombardo / Last updated on 8/25/13 by Shawn Lombardo
Oakland University

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